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Thread: Life in the Trump Era, Part 2

  1. #241
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post


    https://www.psychologytoday.com/conditions/narcissistic-personality-disorder

    I see this all the time in problem physicians I help clients deal with. Often brilliant clinicians have NPD. It's tragic to watch as they wreck their careers and hurt people around them, including their patients.
    As I have said before, I worked as a young associate for two separate senior litigators each of whom had NPD. Trump reminds me of them very much. The difference, though, is that they were very smart, skilled, and able to read and analyze complex briefs or arguments and process large amounts information quickly. Same must be true with brain surgeons, etc. Not true with Trump. There has been a lot of speculation that his inability to process information suggests the early stages of dementia. There have been a spate of articles recently pointing out his speech patterns in interviews, particularly the NYT interview last week; I saw one the other day that showed him drinking water behind a podium on two separate occasions. Both times he held the cup in both hands and moved it to his mouth very deliberately, like a child trying not to spill hot chocolate. That might suggest a loss of motor control, although from all accounts he is a very good golfer, esp. for his age.

  2. #242
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Life in the Trump Era, Part 2

    Quote Originally Posted by concerned View Post
    As I have said before, I worked as a young associate for two separate senior litigators each of whom had NPD. Trump reminds me of them very much. The difference, though, is that they were very smart, skilled, and able to read and analyze complex briefs or arguments and process large amounts information quickly. Same must be true with brain surgeons, etc. Not true with Trump. There has been a lot of speculation that his inability to process information suggests the early stages of dementia. There have been a spate of articles recently pointing out his speech patterns in interviews, particularly the NYT interview last week; I saw one the other day that showed him drinking water behind a podium on two separate occasions. Both times he held the cup in both hands and moved it to his mouth very deliberately, like a child trying not to spill hot chocolate. That might suggest a loss of motor control, although from all accounts he is a very good golfer, esp. for his age.
    As a human being I would be sorry for Trump to have such an illness befall him. As an American I would be relieved to see VP Pence assume the presidency. He could make Mitt Romney his VP. Or maybe we'd see a national unity presidency, with Bill Clinton as his VP. 😉

    It is true in my experience that people with NPD are often brilliant high achievers.
    Last edited by LA Ute; 01-04-2018 at 02:31 PM.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  3. #243
    Administrator U-Ute's Avatar
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    Trump all but guarantees that "Fire And Fury" will be a runaway hit by trying to hit the publisher with a C&D order.

    Retailers are now buying it up in droves driving it to #1.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/publish...ook-1515096609

    What an idiot.

  4. #244
    Sampling the cable news political talk shows tonight, CNN & MSNBC were all over the Fire & Fury story (copies in hand) along with Trump's mental well being, with former Watergate prosecutors proffering insight, ex-GOP national chairman Michael Steele offering grim views of what this all means for Trump, etc. Very predictable coverage, but pretty powerful.

    (How Trump came to believe that allowing writer Michael Wolff unfettered access to all things in the White House would somehow be a positive thing will be a question for the ages.)

    Meanwhile, over on Planet Fox, Tucker Carlson was skewering some advocate for DACA saying the fast food jobs these kids have will be going away, and they'll all end up on the public dole. I remember a few short years ago when Tucker was a skinny guy with a bow tie. He's been hitting the buffet pretty hard, and I'm guessing during the Trump reign has been gnawing on his fingernails during production meetings.

  5. #245
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    I interrupt the schadenfreude-fest here with some sober thoughts from the good old Wall Street Journal:

    The Book of Bannon

    Trump’s divorce from his former aide is good for his Presidency and the GOP.

    Washington is having another media meltdown, this time over the public divorce between Donald Trump and former aide Stephen Bannon over a new book on President Trump’s first months in office. Our reading is that the book tells us what everyone already knew, and the falling out could help the Trump Presidency and Republicans.

    The book is by Michael Wolff, which means it arrives with large factual caveats. Mr. Wolff has a history of combining anecdotes that are true with sweeping assertions that include no substantiation and are often merely his personal conclusions. The media know this, but Mr. Wolff’s quotes and stories reinforce the contempt they have for Mr. Trump so the tales are too good to ignore or try to disprove.

    Most striking, despite the juicy quotes, is how little new the book reveals. Everyone knew Mr. Trump was surprised to win the election, that he then tried to run the White House like he had his family business with rival factions and little discipline, and that the place was a chaotic mess until John Kelly arrived as chief of staff. We also knew that Mr. Trump knew almost nothing about government or policy, that he reads very little, and that he is a narcissist obsessed with his critics. Any sentient voter knew this on Election Day.

    The book is told mainly from Mr. Bannon’s point of view, and the Breitbart impresario is portrayed as thinking Mr. Trump is as much a dolt as Democrats think he is. He dislikes the Trump family, especially son-in-law Jared Kushner, who was a rival for influence.

    The book also makes clear that Mr. Bannon was a leading cause of the pre-Kelly White House chaos. He and the press corps have a relationship of mutual loathing but co-dependency. They use each other, and the media love to promote Mr. Bannon because he is a talkative source and a destructive political force inside the Republican Party.

    The press is also playing up Mr. Bannon’s claims, which he doesn’t deny, that Don Jr.’s meeting with Russians in June 2016 was “treasonous” and that Don Jr. and Mr. Kushner will be cashiered for money laundering. So the same reporters who think Mr. Bannon is a xenophobe and bigot now view him as a legal authority. There’s that co-dependency thing again.

    The surprise is that Mr. Trump kept Mr. Bannon around as long as he did, and the reason is probably what LBJ said about keeping J. Edgar Hoover micturating inside the tent. But Mr. Bannon fed Mr. Trump’s political paranoia and his worst policy instincts such as tearing up Nafta. Mr. Bannon resembles Pat Buchanan, a protectionist predecessor to Mr. Trump, in being at heart an American declinist. He rails against the present in favor of a more idyllic past. Recall the “American carnage” of the Trump inaugural.

    He also tried to conjure a grand theory of Trumpism that isn’t possible. The Trump appeal is a cult of personality that combines sometimes destructive populist passions for restricting trade and immigration with healthier instincts to revive the private economy and restore American strength in the world. For all of his demagoguery, Mr. Trump is no declinist.

    ***
    The President finally fired Mr. Bannon after Mr. Kelly came aboard and Mr. Bannon defied the new chief by attacking his colleagues in an unapproved interview. The White House has since become a saner place, notwithstanding Mr. Trump’s Twitter effusions.

    The Trump-Bannon divorce is therefore a political relief. The President’s worst mistakes have come from heeding Mr. Bannon’s desire to blow up the status quo first and pick up the pieces later—think of the travel ban. The President’s successes have come when he has bursts of discipline while pursuing the more conventional conservative agenda on judges, tax reform, regulation and foreign policy.

    If Mr. Bannon’s assaults on his former boss marginalize Mr. Bannon a player in Republican politics, as they certainly should, so much the better for the 2018 elections and the rest of the Trump Presidency.

    Appeared in the January 5, 2018, print edition.
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-boo...non-1515111214

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  6. #246
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    The clown show expands.

    Breitbart Owners Debate Ousting Bannon Amid Trump Feud - The Wall Street Journal.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/breitba...eud-1515100110

    It’s hard to rank Trump’s mistakes but hiring Bannon is at or near the top.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  7. #247
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    The AP English teacher both concerned and I had in high school (although I am much younger than concerned) taught us about critical thinking. In that spirit, here are a couple of liberal writers doing some of that kind of thinking about Michael Wolff.

    Paul Farhi, the WaPo media reporter:

    Michael Wolff tells a juicy tale in his new Trump book. But should we believe it?

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...=.1cccab9f03f9

    The New Republic’s Alex Shephard:

    Michael Wolff’s Fire and Fury Is a Gift to Donald Trump

    https://newrepublic.com/article/1464...t-donald-trump

    In a world verging on madness, skepticism can be important. It helps me, at least, to keep my Trump era astonishment, shock, dismay, anger, and sadness in some kind of rational and emotional perspective.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  8. #248
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    I interrupt the schadenfreude-fest here with some sober thoughts from the good old Wall Street Journal:



    https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-boo...non-1515111214
    The party was going to coalesce around Trump after Roy Moore, and the retirements of Flake and Corker, anyway. It is Trump's party thru and thru. Bannon was pretty much neutered before this, but now his wont have Mercer money for insurgent candidates, apparently. That is in the short term; what happens in the longer term (i.e., mid term elections) is a completely different question. I think this book makes it that much harder on the margins to take Trump seriously or credulously, and to get his approval rating above 38%. It probably all turns on what evidence is out there to be discovered or disclosed.

  9. #249






    this was funny, to me anyway.

  10. #250
    Administrator U-Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by concerned View Post
    this was funny, to me anyway.
    I got a good chuckle out of it too.

    via GIPHY


  11. #251
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    The AP English teacher both concerned and I had in high school.....

    So you had Scanlan......some of us didn't peak in high school.
    “Children and dogs are as necessary to the welfare of the country as Wall Street and the railroads.” -- Harry S. Truman

    "You never soar so high as when you stoop down to help a child or an animal." -- Jewish Proverb

    "Three-time Pro Bowler Eric Weddle the most versatile, and maybe most intelligent, safety in the game." -- SI, 9/7/15, p. 107.

  12. #252
    Quote Originally Posted by mUUser View Post
    So you had Scanlan......some of us didn't peak in high school.

    LA Ute seems to be saying he hasn't engaged in any critical thinking since Dr. Scanland.

  13. #253
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by concerned View Post
    LA Ute seems to be saying he hasn't engaged in any critical thinking since Dr. Scanland.
    I adored her. She is one of those teachers who left a lasting impression. So did Hugh Rush, Caroline Miner, and Lew Webster (despite his lazy approach to AP History). God bless them all.

    BTW, I think Dr. S. would like us to spell her name right:

    Obituary: Sylvia Bellamy Scandland


    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  14. #254
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Senators Ask Justice Department to Open Criminal Probe Into Trump Dossier Author

    Two Republican senators have asked the Justice Department to open a criminal investigation into whether the author of a controversial research document on President Donald Trump lied to investigators.

    Sens. Chuck Grassley of Iowa and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina say they have found evidence that former British spy Christopher Steele made false statements to federal investigators about how he disseminated his research, which has taken center stage in the investigation into Russian activity during the 2016 election.


    *****
    As I said earlier, let's get all the truth out.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  15. #255
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    I adored her. She is one of those teachers who left a lasting impression. So did Hugh Rush, Caroline Miner, and Lew Webster (despite his lazy approach to AP History). God bless them all.

    BTW, I think Dr. S. would like us to spell her name right:

    Obituary: Sylvia Bellamy Scandland
    I actually thought i learned more from Lew Webster than Dr. Scandland, even though both he and Brimley were extremely lazy, because of all the papers we had to write. That was great preparation for college, and not one of my kids ever had a teacher who made them write research papers outside of class, really. It is too much work to grade.

  16. #256
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by concerned View Post
    I actually thought i learned more from Lew Webster than Dr. Scandland, even though both he and Brimley were extremely lazy, because of all the papers we had to write. That was great preparation for college, and not one of my kids ever had a teacher who made them write research papers outside of class, really. It is too much work to grade.
    True. I learned a lot too. I recall writing most of my AP History papers on Sunday nights. (I did do reading during the week. At least I think I did.)

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  17. #257
    how many times has this been quoted or cited this weekend?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYabrQrXt4A

  18. #258
    Quote Originally Posted by concerned View Post
    I actually thought i learned more from Lew Webster than Dr. Scandland, even though both he and Brimley were extremely lazy, because of all the papers we had to write. That was great preparation for college, and not one of my kids ever had a teacher who made them write research papers outside of class, really. It is too much work to grade.
    As lazy as Lew was in class (almost nonexistent during the second semester) he did read all of those papers.

  19. #259
    “Actually, throughout my life, my two greatest assets have been mental stability and being, like, really smart,”

    Who said it. POTUS or Bart Simpson?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  20. #260
    Quote Originally Posted by Diehard Ute View Post
    “Actually, throughout my life, my two greatest assets have been mental stability and being, like, really smart,”

    Who said it. POTUS or Bart Simpson?
    In defense of Bart Simpson, I'll add more from the same tweet storm:

    "I think (what I've done) would qualify as not smart, but genius....and a very stable genius at that!"


  21. #261
    Quote Originally Posted by Irving Washington View Post
    As lazy as Lew was in class (almost nonexistent during the second semester) he did read all of those papers.
    He graded them. Maybe he read them too.

  22. #262
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    “Democrats are usually eager to slap taxes on millionaires. But now, they’re so desperate to discredit GOP tax reform that they’re defending deductions for the nation’s wealthiest homeowners in expensive East and West coast enclaves.”

    https://nypost.com/2018/01/02/new-ta...n-for-renters/



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  23. #263
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    “Democrats are usually eager to slap taxes on millionaires. But now, they’re so desperate to discredit GOP tax reform that they’re defending deductions for the nation’s wealthiest homeowners in expensive East and West coast enclaves.”

    https://nypost.com/2018/01/02/new-ta...n-for-renters/ Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Is it a win for you when your tax liability does not change but that of your neighbor goes up? I'm not a tax guy, but doesn't the landlord still get to deduct 100% of the property tax paid on the rental property as a business expense? I can't believe a real estate developer friendly Congress and President would limit that expense.

    Unless the Dems are suggesting that there should be no cap (I don't think they are) then the opinion of the author is wrong. The $10,000 limit certainly impacts many families that are not millionaires. I don't consider my daughters and their families who live in modest 20-30 year old homes in California and who earn about $150k per year millionaires. I know that on their 1800 sq. ft. homes that cost about 600k they pay property and state and local income taxes of over 10k. I don't have a problem with a limit, I think it probably should have limited the deduction to something like 15% of adjusted gross income or $20,000, whichever is smaller. I also think the tax bill should have reduced the cap on charitable deductions from 50% of adjusted gross income to 10% or 15% of adjusted gross income or $20,000, whichever is smaller. Giving is great, but I just don't believe that any other taxpayer should subsidize my charitable giving. I also believe that what qualifies as a charity these days simply allows those with means to create charitable organizations as a means of avoiding taxes.

  24. #264
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UTEopia View Post
    Is it a win for you when your tax liability does not change but that of your neighbor goes up? I'm not a tax guy, but doesn't the landlord still get to deduct 100% of the property tax paid on the rental property as a business expense? I can't believe a real estate developer friendly Congress and President would limit that expense.

    Unless the Dems are suggesting that there should be no cap (I don't think they are) then the opinion of the author is wrong. The $10,000 limit certainly impacts many families that are not millionaires. I don't consider my daughters and their families who live in modest 20-30 year old homes in California and who earn about $150k per year millionaires. I know that on their 1800 sq. ft. homes that cost about 600k they pay property and state and local income taxes of over 10k. I don't have a problem with a limit, I think it probably should have limited the deduction to something like 15% of adjusted gross income or $20,000, whichever is smaller. I also think the tax bill should have reduced the cap on charitable deductions from 50% of adjusted gross income to 10% or 15% of adjusted gross income or $20,000, whichever is smaller. Giving is great, but I just don't believe that any other taxpayer should subsidize my charitable giving. I also believe that what qualifies as a charity these days simply allows those with means to create charitable organizations as a means of avoiding taxes.
    I should have said that I found the argument that renters were benefiting from the bill pretty weak. I just liked the quote. Many liberals have a fit whenever high-income taxpayers get a rate cut. But here we have Governor Cuomo and Governor Brown, from two of the three or four most liberal states in the country, fighting for their ultra-wealthy residents.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  25. #265
    Quote Originally Posted by UTEopia View Post
    Is it a win for you when your tax liability does not change but that of your neighbor goes up? I'm not a tax guy, but doesn't the landlord still get to deduct 100% of the property tax paid on the rental property as a business expense? I can't believe a real estate developer friendly Congress and President would limit that expense.

    Unless the Dems are suggesting that there should be no cap (I don't think they are) then the opinion of the author is wrong. The $10,000 limit certainly impacts many families that are not millionaires. I don't consider my daughters and their families who live in modest 20-30 year old homes in California and who earn about $150k per year millionaires. I know that on their 1800 sq. ft. homes that cost about 600k they pay property and state and local income taxes of over 10k. I don't have a problem with a limit, I think it probably should have limited the deduction to something like 15% of adjusted gross income or $20,000, whichever is smaller. I also think the tax bill should have reduced the cap on charitable deductions from 50% of adjusted gross income to 10% or 15% of adjusted gross income or $20,000, whichever is smaller. Giving is great, but I just don't believe that any other taxpayer should subsidize my charitable giving. I also believe that what qualifies as a charity these days simply allows those with means to create charitable organizations as a means of avoiding taxes.
    My wife and I, who combined don’t make $120,000, will be very close to paying $10,000 in state income and property taxes. (I don’t know the tax bill on my new house yet as it’s not done, but my house is less than $400,000 and I’ll pay somewhere between $2,500 and $3,000 in property tax most likely)

    Taxes are very strange things. In years past when my coworkers and I have compared taxes it’s been amazing how much more I’ve paid, because I don’t have kids.

    (As a tax aside, Utah has a car tax racket. Pay thousands in sales tax to buy the car, then pay property tax on it each year)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  26. #266
    B/c real estate is generally expensive here relative to income, and b/c Utah is both a high property and income tax state, a lot of people who are not wealthy are going to exceed the $10K cap, maybe by quite a bit.

  27. #267
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by concerned View Post
    B/c real estate is generally expensive here relative to income, and b/c Utah is both a high property and income tax state, a lot of people who are not wealthy are going to exceed the $10K cap, maybe by quite a bit.
    So their taxable income total will go up accordingly. The (weak) GOP justification is that states should not be rewarded for having high SALT. Except it's not the states that are being penalized for their high taxes -- it is the taxpayers who happen to live in those states. A weird way to use federalism -- incentivize residents of high-SALT states to move to other states, in hopes that doing so will do -- what? Encourage those state governments to reduce taxes? It's a Rube Goldberg device, and a defective one at that. Besides, by weaponizing the federal tax collection system the Repubs are guaranteeing that the tables will be turned in the future.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  28. #268
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Oh, please.


    Bannon Offers Multiple Apologies for Quotes in Wolff Book

    https://www.lifezette.com/polizette/...in-wolff-book/
    Bannon Offers Multiple Apologies for Quotes in Wolff Book

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  29. #269
    Quote Originally Posted by concerned View Post
    .......and b/c Utah is both a high property and income tax state.....
    I don't believe that's true. Utah has very reasonable real estate taxes. I've owned homes in seven states across the country, and only one state had lower property taxes. I'd bet Utah property taxes fall in (or near) the bottom quartile nationwide.
    “Children and dogs are as necessary to the welfare of the country as Wall Street and the railroads.” -- Harry S. Truman

    "You never soar so high as when you stoop down to help a child or an animal." -- Jewish Proverb

    "Three-time Pro Bowler Eric Weddle the most versatile, and maybe most intelligent, safety in the game." -- SI, 9/7/15, p. 107.

  30. #270
    Quote Originally Posted by mUUser View Post
    I don't believe that's true. Utah has very reasonable real estate taxes. I've owned homes in seven states across the country, and only one state had lower property taxes. I'd bet Utah property taxes fall in (or near) the bottom quartile nationwide.
    Property tax in Wisconsin was crazy high. Of course, I had a beautiful restored 1907 victorian on Lake Michigan there for under $200,000.

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