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Thread: What do you ride?

  1. #1

    What do you ride?

    Do to knee problems, I'm not able to ride nearly as much or as hard as I used to. I'm still a gear head though, and still lust after all things carbon and titanium. I know we have some accomplished and even casual riders on this board. I'd love to hear about what others ride, both road and mountain.

    I currently have an Ibis Mojo hardtail, just for riding around. It's a classic and timeless bike and design. It's got the Moron steel tubing (more on their ends, a dig at Genius tubing), but sadly doesn't have the famous Ibis Hand-Job rear brake cable guide.
    ibis_ss.jpg
    Last edited by chrisrenrut; 02-25-2013 at 12:53 PM.

  2. #2
    This fall I decided to give road biking a shot and started with an entry-level Specialized Secteur. I like it quite a bit for what it is, and I'm hoping to use it quite a bit this spring when the weather improves. I passed my old Rock Hopper on to my son.

  3. #3
    I've been riding road bikes for more than 20 years now. I'm 6'6" and have had a hard time finding a set up that suits me, especially at high speeds where things tend to get a little squirrelly.

    I've ridden Trek, 3 different styles of Bianchi (one of which was a solo coast to coast adventure), and Tomassini. I currently ride a custom Co-motion frame disguised as a Fish Lips which is owned by a good friend of mine.

    After trying my hand at with other metals and composites, I don't think I'll ever own a non-steel frame again. I'm probably too much of a traditionalist, but for comfort and performance, that's the bang for my buck.

    The 64 cm frame is complimented by a carbon Wound-Up fork and geared out in full Dura Ace. The biggest issue is that, like my music collection, little has been invested into it since I got married 7 years ago. Which has been okay since it's only been ridden about that many times a year since, but as my kids get a little older, I'm holding out hope that this improves.

    About the time that I got married, I got connected with a frame builder in Montana who owns a company called Kirk Frames. This guy shares my identical build (tall and skinny) and so I was intrigued on what kind of machine he could put together for me. Well, since I didn't have any complaints about my Fish Lips and lacked the funds to build up a completely new bike, this thing has sat in a frame bag in my garage for 8 years. An unfortunate tragedy.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Schr-Ute View Post
    I've been riding road bikes for more than 20 years now. I'm 6'6" and have had a hard time finding a set up that suits me, especially at high speeds where things tend to get a little squirrelly.

    I've ridden Trek, 3 different styles of Bianchi (one of which was a solo coast to coast adventure), and Tomassini. I currently ride a custom Co-motion frame disguised as a Fish Lips which is owned by a good friend of mine.

    After trying my hand at with other metals and composites, I don't think I'll ever own a non-steel frame again. I'm probably too much of a traditionalist, but for comfort and performance, that's the bang for my buck.

    The 64 cm frame is complimented by a carbon Wound-Up fork and geared out in full Dura Ace. The biggest issue is that, like my music collection, little has been invested into it since I got married 7 years ago. Which has been okay since it's only been ridden about that many times a year since, but as my kids get a little older, I'm holding out hope that this improves.

    About the time that I got married, I got connected with a frame builder in Montana who owns a company called Kirk Frames. This guy shares my identical build (tall and skinny) and so I was intrigued on what kind of machine he could put together for me. Well, since I didn't have any complaints about my Fish Lips and lacked the funds to build up a completely new bike, this thing has sat in a frame bag in my garage for 8 years. An unfortunate tragedy.
    64cm!! I get crazy looks on my 58cm bikes (I could step up to 60, but it would be a stretch - and then I couldn't stick it in the back seat of my truck as easy).

    I am now in triathlon mode so I ride a Cervelo P2, which I love. My road bike - the one I share with my lovely wife, who is also tall enough to warrant a 58cm frame - is a Specialized Tarmac. I have SRAM components on the Tarmac (Rival grouping) and Shimano on the P2 (Ultegra). I think the Shimano shift a bit crisper but I like the SRAM lever system much more on non-tri bikes.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Pheidippides View Post
    64cm!! I get crazy looks on my 58cm bikes (I could step up to 60, but it would be a stretch - and then I couldn't stick it in the back seat of my truck as easy).
    Oh, it gets worse. I have to use a mtn bike seat post to get the length needed to be properly fitted. Needless to say, I was a popular drafting target back in the racing days.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Schr-Ute View Post
    Oh, it gets worse. I have to use a mtn bike seat post to get the length needed to be properly fitted. Needless to say, I was a popular drafting target back in the racing days.
    Lol, that's the way I am in a group - the guy everybody likes to draft off of. I'm not a huge guy but I'm pretty big as people who know me can attest.

    In the group I used to ride in there was a woman who was a very good cyclist. I always hated trying to draft off of her because she was so small. It was like getting no effect at all.

  7. #7
    Lemond Ti frame. Favorite bike ever.

  8. #8
    I ride an Orbea Opal. I rode a Kestrel for years until it got stolen from my garage, the Orbea had a similar ride. I used to ride a 61cm frame, but switched to 58cm on my Orbea, not certain if I like it as much. I kind of like being stretched out a bit.

  9. #9
    I ride a mid range(components) Sectaur. It is my first road bike, and it has served me very well.
    “Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.”
    André Gide

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Jarid in Cedar View Post
    I ride a mid range(components) Sectaur. It is my first road bike, and it has served me very well.
    I think the secteur is a good bike. I think it's pretty much like the Roubaix except aluminum instead of carbon fiber.

  11. #11
    What is the name of the carbon bike manufacturer in Utah County? My brother has one of those and loves it, and I am contemplating getting one. I need to get back into riding so I can lose the 30# or so I have packed on over the last 15 yrs of having a desk job...

  12. #12
    Is it Fezarri?

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Jarid in Cedar View Post
    I ride a mid range(components) Sectaur. It is my first road bike, and it has served me very well.
    How do you like the compact frame? My first road bike was a Giant with a compact frame that got squirrely in fast descents, massive speed wobbles (one time so bad that once I got the bike back under control I had to sit on the side of the road and think about what exactly I wanted to do with my life for a bit).

    At the time I was told it was because I was 'too tall' for a compact frame. I switched to a more traditional frame after that and had no issues. Since then I've had guys as tall and taller than me ride compact frames with no issues.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    Is it Fezarri?
    I think so. Any thoughts? I kind of dig the thought of a custom sized frame.

    Looking back I should have purchased a bike from Ted Wojcik when I lived near him (and knew his son). They are fully custom built and are GORGEOUS. I love the flame design on the lugs.

    http://www.tedwojcikcustombicycles.c...ary-frame.aspx

    (And to be honest, when I said 30# I really meant 55#. But I am 6'6", so perhaps I carry it better...)

  15. #15
    I haven't heard much about them actually, just positive stuff. Truth be known, if you like the ride and it is a quality bike then it is a good bike. The main cost differences really come down to grams lighter on a bike. 99% of cyclists can shave more grams on their body cheaper than on their bike.

    The other thing to consider is the type of riding you are going to do, if you are going to do lots of centuries an aluminum might be harsh, if you are doing short rides it is just fine.

  16. #16
    When I was a teen our scout/YM group did a lot of riding. We would ride to Lake Powell every summer, and many of us got hooked. For a number of years I would ride 10-20 miles before school every morning and then do a 50+ ride every Saturday with my friends. One dream was to do a cross-country ride. (Note: Dwight Schr-Ute, you need to tell the story of your trans-America ride sometime)

    Then life got in the way for 15 yrs. I am ready to put on some road miles again. Some of the rides near me offer world-class views of some of the most stunning scenery in existence, and it is a shame that I do not take advantage of it!

  17. #17
    1428177101p.jpg

    Eat my dust.


    -What would you do
    if you saw spaceships over Glasgow?
    Would you fear them?
    Every aircraft, every camera, is a wish that wasn't granted.

    What was that for?
    Try to be bad.


  18. #18
    Dude, I doubt I could even catch up to that big wheel. My wife does triathlons and teaches spin classes and she just laughs at me...

  19. #19
    Thanks for the compliment. I have completed a triathlon and I have not taught a spin class in oer a month but I do love to ride bicycles. I would love it if you would start by riding your bike the 6 miles to work. I know it is up hill both ways but you have strong legs and would save us $5 a day in parking. Health, money, fun......what more do you need to motivate you .

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    How do you like the compact frame? My first road bike was a Giant with a compact frame that got squirrely in fast descents, massive speed wobbles (one time so bad that once I got the bike back under control I had to sit on the side of the road and think about what exactly I wanted to do with my life for a bit).

    At the time I was told it was because I was 'too tall' for a compact frame. I switched to a more traditional frame after that and had no issues. Since then I've had guys as tall and taller than me ride compact frames with no issues.
    I am 6'0", but I am more torso than legs(cursed Scottish genes!), so the compact frame really fits me well. I hit 55 going down Snoqualmie without a wobble or any scary handling. I may eventually upgrade, but probably not until I decide that I want to try more challenging rides like LOTOJA.
    “Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.”
    André Gide

  21. #21
    I have a Cannondale R2000 that I bought new in 1998 when we moved to Philadelphia. It has Ultegra components and I upgraded the wheels to Mavic Kysrium. I'm a bit over 6'5" and the 63cm frame works pretty well. In Philly I rode quite a bit - we had a group at work that would go out weekly, and during the summer and fall I would ride the 8 miles into work and add some more on the way home. There are some great bike trails as well. From our house to Valley Forge and back was about 30 miles all on a paved trail. Since moving back I don't get out much at all due to work, family, laziness. I've priced out a Santa Cruz Tall Boy but haven't pulled the trigger yet - maybe this spring.
    "Don't apologize; it's not your fault. It's my fault for overestimating your competence."

  22. #22
    I ride a Motobecane mtn bike. Actually getting ready to pull it out of the basement to ride to work.. But I may need to wait another month.. But I am excited to pull it back out...

  23. #23
    42-639x421.jpg

    http://kelsonbikes.com/

    http://velonews.competitor.com/2013/...de-show_275638

    Brian Williams, a riding buddy from Ashton, makes custom TI and carbon bikes under the Kelson name. This is a picture from the NAHBS show this past week in Denver.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by RC Vikings View Post
    42-639x421.jpg

    http://kelsonbikes.com/

    http://velonews.competitor.com/2013/...de-show_275638

    Brian Williams, a riding buddy from Ashton, makes custom TI and carbon bikes under the Kelson name. This is a picture from the NAHBS show this past week in Denver.
    Welcome, RC. I hope you drop by on occasion to share your biking exploits.
    “Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.”
    André Gide

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by RC Vikings View Post
    42-639x421.jpg

    http://kelsonbikes.com/

    http://velonews.competitor.com/2013/...de-show_275638

    Brian Williams, a riding buddy from Ashton, makes custom TI and carbon bikes under the Kelson name. This is a picture from the NAHBS show this past week in Denver.
    :drooling:

    Blue Goose just won this thread.
    Dyslexics of the world, untie!

  26. #26
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  27. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    This probably should have been used as its own thread.

    Felony manslaughter sounds pretty harsh, but it sounds like he was being very reckless. Running two red lights and a stop sign leading up to the collision pretty much tell you all you need to know. I would have no problem with the charges if the guy was in a vehicle, so why should I feel different because he was on a bike?

    I get really tired of the cycling mentality where no rules apply to them. Red lights become brake checks, stop signs even less. It makes those of us on the road trying to demand some respect from motorists all the more difficult. I've been involved in road rage incidents that I know had very little to do with how I was riding.

    Around the corner from my house is a four way stop coming out of a canyon and I would say that, at best, half of the cyclists that go through the intersection without touching their brakes. Which I couldn't care less if I haven't already been waiting at a stop 5 seconds before they go flying through. If I were in the business of killing cyclists to prove a point, I'd be a busy man.

    Then there's the large group rides of 50+ riders that consider themselves a single entity no matter how much space there is between themselves and the bike in front of them.

    I don't really know why I'm ranting this morning. In fairness of full disclosure, I used to be the exact guy discribed above. But it was stupid and dangerous. Now that I'm not 20 any more, I can see that. It confuses me when 50 year old guys don't.

  28. #28
    Educating Cyrus wuapinmon's Avatar
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    Anybody thinking of getting one of these?

    http://www.theatlanticcities.com/des...-bicycle/4954/

  29. #29
    Three flats in one ride = a bad day on the bike. First flat was my back tire about 2 blocks from my house. Second flat was on my front tire about 15 miles out from my house. Third flat was on my back tire about 10 miles away from returning home. I had enough for 2 flats, but not 3. Had to make the call of shame to my wife to pick me up.

    I don't think I've ever got more than 2 flats in single 1 hour-ish ride ever.

    I think my bulk discount tube purchase from chainlove.com may have been a mistake.

  30. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    Three flats in one ride = a bad day on the bike. First flat was my back tire about 2 blocks from my house. Second flat was on my front tire about 15 miles out from my house. Third flat was on my back tire about 10 miles away from returning home. I had enough for 2 flats, but not 3. Had to make the call of shame to my wife to pick me up.

    I don't think I've ever got more than 2 flats in single 1 hour-ish ride ever.

    I think my bulk discount tube purchase from chainlove.com may have been a mistake.
    Sorry. That is a very crappy ride. My record is two. Both on the front. I missed the glass embedded in the tire the first time. It took inverting the tire to actually find it.
    “Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.”
    André Gide

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