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Thread: A Believer Thread

  1. #511
    Senior Member Scorcho's Avatar
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    Brother Scorcho,

    Just wanted to remind you that next weekend your family is scheduled to clean the chapel, oh and since they have removed the Wi-Fi from the building you are scheduled to provide an internet hot spot

    I think next week I'm going to ask the library for a film strip and a cassette recorder



  2. #512
    Archaeologists find what they believe to be the birthplace of three of Jesus' apostles: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...les/546094001/

    For decades archaeologists have searched for the fishing village where apostles Peter, Andrew and Philip lived, according to the New Testament. Three possible sites in the area had been identified but all were inconclusive.

    This summer, however, during the second year of excavating, a team from Israel’s Kinneret College discovered remnants of a Roman-era bathhouse, potsherds and coins from the first to third centuries.


    These findings are consistent with the chronicles of the 1st century historian Josephus Flavius, who wrote that the Roman King Philip Herod transformed the small village of Bethsaida into a polis, or city state, called Julias.
    “It only ends once. Anything that happens before that is just progress.”

    Well, because he thought it was good sport. Because some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned, or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.

  3. #513
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    It's 2018 and NPR Doesn't Know What Christians Commemorate on Easter

    https://pjmedia.com/faith/good-frida...-commemorates/

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  4. #514
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    It's 2018 and NPR Doesn't Know What Christians Commemorate on Easter

    https://pjmedia.com/faith/good-frida...-commemorates/
    War on Easter!!!!

  5. #515
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    A Believer Thread

    By a Catholic writer:

    The Easter Effect and How It Changed the World


    The first Christians were baffled by what they called ‘the Resurrection.’ Their struggle to understand it brought about astonishing success for their faith

    By George Weigel

    March 30, 2018 10:05 a.m. ET579 COMMENTS

    In the year 312, just before his victory at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge won him the undisputed leadership of the Roman Empire, Constantine the Great had a heavenly vision of Christian symbols. That augury led him, a year later, to end all legal sanctions on the public profession of Christianity.

    Or so a pious tradition has it.

    But there’s a more mundane explanation for Constantine’s decision: He was a politician who had shrewdly decided to join the winning side. By the early 4th century, Christians likely counted for between a quarter and a half of the population of the Roman Empire, and their exponential growth seemed likely to continue.

    How did this happen? How did a ragtag band of nobodies from the far edges of the Mediterranean world become such a dominant force in just two and a half centuries? The historical sociology of this extraordinary phenomenon has been explored by Rodney Stark of Baylor University, who argues that Christianity modeled a nobler way of life than what was on offer elsewhere in the rather brutal society of the day. In Christianity, women were respected as they weren’t in classical culture and played a critical role in bringing men to the faith and attracting converts. In an age of plagues, the readiness of Christians to care for all the sick, not just their own, was a factor, as was the impressive witness to faith of countless martyrs. Christianity also grew from within because Christians had larger families, a byproduct of their faith’s prohibition of contraception, abortion and infanticide.

    For theologians who like to think that arguments won the day for the Christian faith, this sort of historical reconstruction is not particularly gratifying, but it makes a lot of human sense. Prof. Stark’s analysis still leaves us with a question, though: How did all that modeling of a compelling, alternative way of life get started? And that, in turn, brings us back to that gaggle of nobodies in the early first century A.D. and what happened to them.

    What happened to them was the Easter Effect.


    There is no accounting for the rise of Christianity without weighing the revolutionary effect on those nobodies of what they called “the Resurrection”: their encounter with the one whom they embraced as the Risen Lord, whom they first knew as the itinerant Jewish rabbi, Jesus of Nazareth, and who died an agonizing and shameful death on a Roman cross outside Jerusalem. As N.T. Wright, one of the Anglosphere’s pre-eminent biblical scholars, makes clear, that first generation answered the question of why they were Christians with a straightforward answer: because Jesus was raised from the dead.


    Now that, as some disgruntled listeners once complained about Jesus’ preaching, is “a hard saying.” It was no less challenging two millennia ago than it is today.

    And one of the most striking things about the New Testament accounts of Easter, and what followed in the days immediately after Easter, is that the Gospel writers and editors carefully preserved the memory of the first Christians’ bafflement, skepticism and even fright about what had happened to their former teacher and what was happening to them.

    In Mark’s gospel, Mary Magdalene and other women in Jesus’ entourage find his tomb empty and a young man sitting nearby telling them that “Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified…has risen; he is not here.” But they had no idea what that was all about, “and went out and fled from the tomb…[and] said nothing to anyone, for they were afraid.”

    Two disciples walking to Emmaus from Jerusalem on Easter afternoon haven’t a clue as to who’s talking with them along their way, interpreting the scriptures and explaining Jesus’ suffering as part of his messianic mission. They don’t even recognize who it is that sits down to supper with them until he breaks bread and asks a blessing: “…and their eyes were opened and they recognized him.” They high-tail it back to Jerusalem to tell the other friends of Jesus, who report that Peter has had a similarly strange experience, but when “Jesus himself stood among them…they were startled and frightened, and supposed that they saw a ghost.”


    Some time later, Peter, John and others in Jesus’ core group are fishing on the Sea of Tiberias. “Jesus stood on the beach,” we are told, “yet the disciples did not know that it was Jesus.” At the very end of these post-Easter accounts, those whom we might expect to have been the first to grasp what was afoot are still skeptical. When that core group of Jesus’ followers goes back to Galilee, they see him, “but some doubted.”


    This remarkable and deliberate recording of the first Christians’ incomprehension of what they insisted was the irreducible bottom line of their faith teaches us two things. First, it tells us that the early Christians were confident enough about what they called the Resurrection that (to borrow from Prof. Wright) they were prepared to say something like, “I know this sounds ridiculous, but it’s what happened.” And the second thing it tells us is that it took time for the first Christians to figure out what the events of Easter meant—not only for Jesus but for themselves. As they worked that out, their thinking about a lot of things changed profoundly, as Prof. Wright and Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI help us to understand in their biblical commentaries.


    The way they thought about time and history changed. During Jesus’ public ministry, many of his followers shared in the Jewish messianic expectations of the time: God would soon work something grand for his people in Israel, liberating them from their oppressors and bringing about a new age in which (as Isaiah had prophesied) the nations would stream to the mountain of the Lord and history would end. The early Christians came to understand that the cataclysmic, world-redeeming act that God had promised had taken place at Easter. God’s Kingdom had come not at the end of time but within time—and that had changed the texture of both time and history. History continued, but those shaped by the Easter Effect became the people who knew how history was going to turn out. Because of that, they could live differently. The Easter Effect impelled them to bring a new standard of equality into the world and to embrace death as martyrs if necessary—because they knew, now, that death did not have the final word in the human story.

    The way they thought about “resurrection” changed. Pious Jews taught by the reforming Pharisees of Jesus’ time believed in the resurrection of the dead. Easter taught the first Christians, who were all pious Jews, that this resurrection was not the resuscitation of a corpse, nor did it involve the decomposition of a corpse. Jesus’ tomb was empty, but the Risen Lord appeared to his disciples in a transformed body. Those who first experienced the Easter Effect would not have put it in these terms, but as their understanding of what had happened to Jesus and to themselves grew, they grasped that (as Benedict XVI put it in “Jesus of Nazareth–Holy Week”) there had been an “evolutionary leap” in the human condition. A new way of being had been encountered in the manifestly human but utterly different life of the one they met as the Risen Lord. That insight radically changed all those who embraced it.

    Which brings us to the next manifestation of the Easter Effect among the first Christians: The way they thought about their responsibilities changed. What had happened to Jesus, they slowly began to grasp, was not just about their former teacher and friend; it was about all of them. His destiny was their destiny. So not only could they face opposition, scorn and even death with confidence; they could offer to others the truth and the fellowship they had been given. Indeed, they had to do so, to be faithful to what they had experienced. Christian mission is inconceivable without Easter. And that mission would eventually lead these sons and daughters of Abraham to the conviction that the promise that God had made to the People of Israel had been extended to those who were not sons and daughters of Abraham. Because of Easter, the gentiles, too, could be embraced in a relationship—a covenant—with the one God, which was embodied in righteous living.

    The way they thought about worship and its temporal rhythms changed. For the Jews who were the first members of the Jesus movement, nothing was more sacrosanct than the Sabbath, the seventh day of rest and worship. The Sabbath was enshrined in creation, for God himself had rested on the seventh day. The Sabbath’s importance as a key behavioral marker of the People of God had been reaffirmed in the Ten Commandments. Yet these first Christians, all Jews, quickly fixed Sunday as the “Lord’s Day,” because Easter had been a Sunday. Benedict XVI draws out the crucial point here:

    “Only an event that marked souls indelibly could bring about such a profound realignment of the religious culture of the week. Mere theological speculations could not have achieved this... [The] celebration of the Lord’s day, which was characteristic of the Christian community from the outset, is one of the most convincing proofs that something extraordinary happened [at Easter]—the discovery of the empty tomb and the encounter with the Risen Lord.”


    Without the Easter Effect, there is really no explaining why there was a winning side—the Christian side—for Constantine the Great to choose. That effect, as Prof. Wright puts it, begins with, and is incomprehensible without, the first Christians’ conviction that “Jesus of Nazareth was raised bodily to a new sort of life, three days after his execution.” Recognizing that does not, of course, convince everyone. Nor does it end the mystery of Easter. The first Christians, like Christians today, cannot fully comprehend resurrected life: the life depicted in the Gospels of a transphysical body that can eat, drink and be touched but that also appears and disappears, unbothered by obstacles like doors and distance.

    Nor does Easter mean that everything is always going to turn out just fine, for there is still work to be done in history. As Benedict XVI put it in his 2010 Easter message: “Easter does not work magic. Just as the Israelites found the desert awaiting them on the far side of the Red Sea, so the Church, after the Resurrection, always finds history filled with joy and hope, grief and anguish. And yet this history is changed…it is truly open to the future.”

    Which perhaps offers one final insight into the question with which we began: How did the Jesus movement, beginning on the margins of civilization and led by people of seeming inconsequence, end up being what Constantine regarded as the winning side? However important the role of sociological factors in explaining why Christianity carried the day, there also was that curious and inexplicable joy that marked the early Christians, even as they were being marched off to execution. Was that joy simply delusion? Denial?

    Perhaps it was the Easter Effect: the joy of people who had become convinced that they were witnesses to something inexplicable but nonetheless true. Something that gave a superabundance of meaning to life and that erased the fear of death. Something that had to be shared. Something with which to change the world.

    Mr. Weigel is distinguished senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, where he holds the William E. Simon Chair in Catholic Studies.


    https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-eas...rld-1522418701
    Last edited by LA Ute; 04-01-2018 at 05:05 PM.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  6. #516
    After the Jazz won their pivotal game against the T-Wolves, I changed over to Jesus Christ Superstar on NBC, when John Legend, Alice Cooper & a bunch of Broadway talent redid the original without too much deviation.

    Wow.

    When I was a kid growing up Mormon, Jesus Christ Superstar was a big no-no when it hit the big time. I knew the music score, knew the pivotal players involved in the last days of Jesus, but I'd never watched the movie or seen the rock play.

    Tonight's performance was powerful. John Legend did a superlative job as Jesus, the guy who played Judas was very powerful, Caiaphus, Pilote, Mary Magdalene - all outstanding, even moving. Alice Cooper as Herrod was brief (thank you) and over the top.

    JCS is a dramatic, superficial retelling of one part of Jesus' life, but it's hard not to sense the enormity of what later became the world's largest religion, such as the powerful piece from LA Ute just above on what the resurrection of Jesus meant for Christians, and the world.

    All very thought provoking...

  7. #517
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Nice post by Darius Gray on the LDS.org blog:

    Healing the Wounds of Racism



    Ma'ake, what's your perspective? I'm interested.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  8. #518
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  9. #519
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    Nice post by Darius Gray on the LDS.org blog:

    Healing the Wounds of Racism



    Ma'ake, what's your perspective? I'm interested.
    You probably don't want to hear my opinion, but here it is:

    President Hinckley chastises members for being racist. Kind of ironic, seeing how a lot of those members grew up in a religion where it was taught that blacks were on earth as a representative of the devil (John Taylor, August 28th, 1881, Journal of Discourses 22:304. See also Latter-day Prophets Speak: Selections from the Sermons and Writings of Church Presidents, p. 157, Daniel H. Ludlow, ed.), Joseph Fielding Smith (Joseph Fielding Smith, The Way to Perfection, p. 101) taught that blacks were an inferior race, that marrying someone of another race and having children was a penalty worthy of death (Brigham Young, October 9, 1859, Journal of Discourses 10:110) and listening to Mark E Petersen who would make a KKK member blush at his level of racism.

    Side note on Mark E. Petersen. He said this in a speech in Provo:

    I think I have read enough to give you an idea of what the Negro is after. He is not just seeking the opportunity of sitting down in a cafe where white people sit. He isn't just trying to ride on the same streetcar or the same Pullman car with white people. From this and other interviews I have read, it appears that the Negro seeks absorption with the white race. He will not be satisfied until he achieves it by intermarriage. That is his objective and we must face it. We must not allow our feelings to carry us away, nor must we feel sorry for Negros that we will open our arms and embrace them with everything we have. Remember the little statement that they used to say about sin, "First we pity, then endure, then embrace."
    https://archive.org/stream/RaceProbl...ge/n5/mode/2up

    And that was probably the least offensive remark in that speech.


    Also, isn't there a racist woman on twitter/social media who is very "mormon" and has received no church discipline? Kind of goes against any argument the church has against racism when they allow someone like that to be so prominent.

    All that being said, the article is good and something that the church needs more of. More tolerance, more love, more acceptance. Be more christlike.

    Also, on the video, isn't that kind of cringeworthy? To parade around a bunch of minorities and then have a day to celebrate how you became less racist about 15 years later than most other groups? And then to end with the picture of the white overlords, who were very much apart of the church during the years those horrible things were taught?

    That being said, Mormon me would have eaten this all up and loved it and showed it to all my coworkers and they would politely smile and then awkwardly leave afterwards. Now, it's embarrassing to see.

  10. #520
    Quote Originally Posted by Utah View Post


    You probably don't want to hear my opinion, but here it is:

    President Hinckley chastises members for being racist. Kind of ironic, seeing how a lot of those members grew up in a religion where it was taught that blacks were on earth as a representative of the devil (John Taylor, August 28th, 1881, Journal of Discourses 22:304. See also Latter-day Prophets Speak: Selections from the Sermons and Writings of Church Presidents, p. 157, Daniel H. Ludlow, ed.), Joseph Fielding Smith (Joseph Fielding Smith, The Way to Perfection, p. 101) taught that blacks were an inferior race, that marrying someone of another race and having children was a penalty worthy of death (Brigham Young, October 9, 1859, Journal of Discourses 10:110) and listening to Mark E Petersen who would make a KKK member blush at his level of racism.

    Side note on Mark E. Petersen. He said this in a speech in Provo:



    https://archive.org/stream/RaceProbl...ge/n5/mode/2up

    And that was probably the least offensive remark in that speech.


    Also, isn't there a racist woman on twitter/social media who is very "mormon" and has received no church discipline? Kind of goes against any argument the church has against racism when they allow someone like that to be so prominent.

    All that being said, the article is good and something that the church needs more of. More tolerance, more love, more acceptance. Be more christlike.

    Also, on the video, isn't that kind of cringeworthy? To parade around a bunch of minorities and then have a day to celebrate how you became less racist about 15 years later than most other groups? And then to end with the picture of the white overlords, who were very much apart of the church during the years those horrible things were taught?

    That being said, Mormon me would have eaten this all up and loved it and showed it to all my coworkers and they would politely smile and then awkwardly leave afterwards. Now, it's embarrassing to see.
    LOL.

    I am not even going to touch your first 'point' because its point-less. "An LDS church leader condemned racism which is hilarious because lots of racists have been leaders in the LDS church! How ironic! LOL!" Ok cool.......

    Anyway, I believe you are referencing APurposefulWife.....a) she was at one point Mormon, but last I checked she had set out on her own due to disappointment with the LDS church. b) the First Presidency issued a statement that didn't name her but condemned everything she stands for when she started to get a following. "allow her to be so prominent"? Get out of here with that.

  11. #521
    Quote Originally Posted by UtahsMrSports View Post
    LOL.

    I am not even going to touch your first 'point' because its point-less. "An LDS church leader condemned racism which is hilarious because lots of racists have been leaders in the LDS church! How ironic! LOL!" Ok cool.......

    Anyway, I believe you are referencing APurposefulWife.....a) she was at one point Mormon, but last I checked she had set out on her own due to disappointment with the LDS church. b) the First Presidency issued a statement that didn't name her but condemned everything she stands for when she started to get a following. "allow her to be so prominent"? Get out of here with that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Utah View Post


    You probably don't want to hear my opinion, but here it is:

    At least he warned you.

    As for A Purposeful Wife, I'd love to see your reference on that. Your "when she started to get a following" is a little generous. After she "started to get a following" the New York Post did a highlight piece on her on March 31, 2017. The Salt Lake Tribune did a response piece on her dated April 2, 2017. On August 13, 2017, in response to the Charllotesville, Virginia rally that resulted in the death of a rally protester, the LDS church offered a statement that read:
    For members of the Church, we reaffirm that teaching today and the Savior’s admonition to love our neighbor.
    “Our prayers are with those who are suffering because of this intolerance and hatred. We pray for peace and for understanding. Above all, we pray that we may treat one another with greater kindness, compassion, and goodness.
    And then finally, two days after that, they finally address the 'movement' as directly as they ever have, with another press release:

    It has been called to our attention that there are some among the various pro-white and white supremacy communities who assert that the Church is neutral toward or in support of their views. Nothing could be further from the truth. In the New Testament, Jesus said: ‘Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself’ (Matthew 22:37–39). The Book of Mormon teaches ‘all are alike unto God’” (2 Nephi 26:33).
    “White supremacist attitudes are morally wrong and sinful, and we condemn them. Church members who promote or pursue a ‘white culture’ or white supremacy agenda are not in harmony with the teachings of the Church.
    So...4 1/2 months after she had received national press for her views of Mormonism and white supremacy. I think the response could have been a little quicker. Also, one thing that I find annoying is the idea that these little press releases are enough. Just because you put in on a website doesn't mean it's been properly addressed. I had the same complaint when the released the series on polygamy and blacks and the priesthood, etc. Progress is progress, but I'd be really curious as to how many people actually see those things. I was really hoping for some strong words over the pulpit six weeks later during General Conference, but didn't hear them.

    As a kicker, he's a quote from the Wife herself:
    However, let me be perfectly clear, I have at no time been disciplined, or even spoken to, regarding my political views or activism by a leader of the Church of Jesus Christ of latter-day Saints, at any level, from Bishop to Prophet.
    It seems Twitter found a way to address her voice faster than her local leadership. That's a shame.

  12. #522
    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Schr-Ute View Post
    At least he warned you.

    As for A Purposeful Wife, I'd love to see your reference on that. Your "when she started to get a following" is a little generous. After she "started to get a following" the New York Post did a highlight piece on her on March 31, 2017. The Salt Lake Tribune did a response piece on her dated April 2, 2017. On August 13, 2017, in response to the Charllotesville, Virginia rally that resulted in the death of a rally protester, the LDS church offered a statement that read:


    And then finally, two days after that, they finally address the 'movement' as directly as they ever have, with another press release:



    So...4 1/2 months after she had received national press for her views of Mormonism and white supremacy. I think the response could have been a little quicker. Also, one thing that I find annoying is the idea that these little press releases are enough. Just because you put in on a website doesn't mean it's been properly addressed. I had the same complaint when the released the series on polygamy and blacks and the priesthood, etc. Progress is progress, but I'd be really curious as to how many people actually see those things. I was really hoping for some strong words over the pulpit six weeks later during General Conference, but didn't hear them.

    As a kicker, he's a quote from the Wife herself:


    It seems Twitter found a way to address her voice faster than her local leadership. That's a shame.
    I have no interest in debating the timeline. I think people knew where I was going with that. I would argue that you can find a talk in every single general conference that makes a point, at various levels, that racism has no place in the LDS church and beyond that, I don't know what reasonable measures the church could have taken. They issued the statement when they did, APW responded that she was angry and last I checked she had set out on her own. Shes been booted on twitter. Church discipline at some point has probably either already happened, is happening, or is soon to come if she hasn't left on our own.

  13. #523
    Handsome Boy Graduate mpfunk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    The video is hilarious. Here are images of people of color only to be ended with an image of 3 old white men who are here to tell you more later about how we are going to celebrate.
    So I said to David Eckstein, "You promised me, Eckstein, that if I followed you, you would walk with me always. But I noticed that during the most trying periods of my life, there have only been one set of prints in the sand. Why, when I have needed you most, have you not been there for me?" David Eckstein replied, "Because my little legs had gotten tired, and you were carrying me." And I looked down and saw that I was still carrying David Eckstein.
    --fjm.com

  14. #524
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    A Believer Thread

    Guys, if you want to criticize or mock any faith, not just the LDS one, please don't do it in the Believer Thread. Start your own thread called "Why I dislike/disrespect [insert name of religion]."
    Last edited by LA Ute; 04-12-2018 at 05:22 PM.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  15. #525
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    Guys, if you want to criticize or mock any faith, not just the LDS one, please don't do it in the Believer Thread. Start your own thread called "Why I dislike/disrespect [insert name of religion]."

    I agree with LA here. He and others have been very tolerant of opposing views on stuff. He created this thread for the believers. There is plenty of places to put whatever you like other than this thread. it is disrespectful.

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