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Thread: An officer down in my neighborhood

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by concerned View Post
    Well, I didn't see anything in the Minnesota video to suggest that the passenger was resisting arrest or going for a gun (after he supposedly told the officer he had one per protocol), although the video only captures the aftermath. It is unclear to me why the officer had his gun drawn or why he told the passenger to put his hands in the air for a broken tail light. I suspect, but dont know, that the officer panicked when the passenger told him he had a gun and a permit.

    I don't think any of us can appreciate what it means to an African American and be pulled over because of skin color. My daughter has a very close friend who wants to be a doctor with a 4.0 gpa in the West IB. Her parents are both on the faculty at the U. They were coming back from Moab up highway 6 a couple of weeks ago. The daughter was driving. The highway patrol pulled her over. When he approached the car and realized that there was a family inside, he waved them off and told them to never mind. They knew they were pulled over because the driver was African American. The daughter has expressed to my daughter an extreme sense of violation, and says her parents feels the same way, at least as strongly. Knowing them, I am sure that is true.

    That doesn't happen to us.

    .
    I think I made it pretty clear in my post that I get that they get pulled over more. I've witnessed cars on Highway 6 and on I 80 in between Nephi and and Fillmore being pulled over and the passengers being people of color (the % of the number of cars going through those sections of road whose drivers are black has to be 2% at best, yet, in my limited time driving through those sections of road, I've seen the pull overs). It's disgusting. It's happening. We agree. That still doesn't give anybody right to resist arrest.

    And I should have been more clear. Sure there are instances where there is no resistance and people get shot. But probably 75% of these issues are happening when there is some sort of fleeing or resisting arrest. Shooting at someone fleeing isn't justifiable, but it happens. And I'm not even saying that the police are right in some or most of these instances.

    I'm just saying Cops have guns. If you attack them they WILL shoot you. If you resist arrest in any way, they MAY shoot you. And if you give them lip and refuse to cooperate they just MIGHT shoot you. So, don't do it.

    Are we even disagreeing here? And no kidding it isn't happening to me. I think I made that clear.
    Last edited by Two Utes; 07-08-2016 at 11:09 AM.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Two Utes View Post
    I think I made it pretty clear in my post that I get that they get pulled over more. I've witnessed cars on Highway 6 and on I 80 in between Nephi and and Fillmore being pulled over and the passengers being people of color (the % of the number of cars going through those sections of road whose drivers are black has to be 2% at best, yet, in my limited time driving through those sections of road, I've seen the pull overs). It's disgusting. It's happening. We agree. That still doesn't give anybody right to resist arrest.

    And I should have been more clear. Sure there are instances where there is no resistance and people get shot. But probably 75% of these issues are happening when there is some sort of fleeing or resisting arrest. Shooting at someone fleeing isn't justifiable, but it happens. And I'm not even saying that the police are right in some or most of these instances.

    I'm just saying Cops have guns. If you attack them they WILL shoot you. If you resist arrest in any way, they MAY shoot you. And if you give them lip and refuse to cooperate they just MIGHT shoot you. So, don't do it.

    Are we even disagreeing here? And no kidding it isn't happening to me. I think I made that clear.
    We are not disagreeing except to the extent that you suggest that "it happens to whites too" etc., but not me because I don't have a broken tail light and have insurance. This family I mentioned didn't have a broken tail light either and I assume their registration is current; my only point is that even if whites get pulled over, the sense of violation is not necessarily the same.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by concerned View Post
    We are not disagreeing except to the extent that you suggest that "it happens to whites too" etc., but not me because I don't have a broken tail light and have insurance. This family I mentioned didn't have a broken tail light either and I assume their registration is current; my only point is that even if whites get pulled over, the sense of violation is not necessarily the same.
    it does happen to poor people a lot more than wealthier people. But I could have been clearer.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Two Utes View Post
    I think I made it pretty clear in my post that I get that they get pulled over more. I've witnessed cars on Highway 6 and on I 80 in between Nephi and and Fillmore being pulled over and the passengers being people of color (the % of the number of cars going through those sections of road whose drivers are black has to be 2% at best, yet, in my limited time driving through those sections of road, I've seen the pull overs). It's disgusting. It's happening. We agree. That still doesn't give anybody right to resist arrest.

    And I should have been more clear. Sure there are instances where there is no resistance and people get shot. But probably 75% of these issues are happening when there is some sort of fleeing or resisting arrest. Shooting at someone fleeing isn't justifiable, but it happens. And I'm not even saying that the police are right in some or most of these instances.

    I'm just saying Cops have guns. If you attack them they WILL shoot you. If you resist arrest in any way, they MAY shoot you. And if you give them lip and refuse to cooperate they just MIGHT shoot you. So, don't do it.

    Are we even disagreeing here? And no kidding it isn't happening to me. I think I made that clear.

    I've told my kids that this isn't about police, it is just basic survival. If someone, anyone, has a gun pointed at you, do whatever they say as you can't win. Or if not, run serpentine.

    https://youtu.be/A2_w-QCWpS0

  5. #35
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  6. #36
    We were talking in my family about the Black Lives Matter movement, the police shootings situation, etc. My oldest son, just about to get his Masters in Mining Engineering at the U, told us about an incident he had in high school that we'd never heard before.

    My son and his friend, who is adopted, originally from El Salvador, were pulled over, and the officer took a very aggressive approach with my son's friend, who was the driver. Basically, the officer shoved the kid up on the hood, then had him face down on the pavement, and cuffed him.

    My son got out of the car to try and appeal for calm, and the officer pointed his gun at him, and ordered him back in the car.

    Eventually, both kids were released. The issue? An unpaid parking ticket.

    Understood there are knucklehead cops, just like in every other field, but for a couple of middle class teenagers of color to get this kind of treatment, in Davis County, Utah, is a small indication of what the BLM folks are talking about.

  7. #37
    When I was a teenager we got pulled over asked to exit the car and then thrown up against the car and handcuffed. We matched the description of some other teenagers causing problems (4 teenaged boys in a suburban). Call came in that they had caught them and he let us go warning us to 'watch out step' because you know... we matched a description.

    Not being dismissive, these biases are real but we were lily white and got treated like crap too probably because we were teenagers (a curable ailment).


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  8. #38
    In high school my buddies and I were in my friend's old Oldsmobile (is that repetitive?) to go screw around at the governor's mansion on South Temple (we were friends with the governor's kid and he was with us). We got pulled over by a couple of cops who were just screaming at us, pushing us roughly against the car, and then having us lie face down on the sidewalk on South Temple while he went through the car. He asked us where we were going, so we told him but the cops thought we were screwing with them so they just yelled at us with a lot of rough language. After they searched the car they demanded our IDs, which we turned over. They got really sheepish when they saw the Leavitt driver's license and told us that the car matched a car that had been involved in a shooting and that's why they were acting that way.

    Another time I had seminary, and the seminary at East High is right next to a 7-11. They always let seminary out a few minutes before class gets out to give the kids time to get to class, and I had time to run to 7-11 to grab a donut and Dr. Pepper. As soon as I walked in an undercover cop grabbed me, spun me around, and cuffed me roughly for being out of class. I explained to him what was going on and he didn't care. He shoved me into his unmarked cop car and drove me downtown to a detention-type center and made my mom come pick me up. She was furious because I had to miss a half day of classes. I was pretty polite even though he swore at me a couple of times while I was trying to explain what was going on and that I wasn't actually missing any classes. I was pissed off when he forced me to get into his Dodge Daytona, so when he told me at least I got to drive in a cool cop car I told him that I had the same car and it was a piece of crap (of course mine was about 12 years old and a much bigger piece of crap). After we started driving I also asked him if he was going to put my seat on (since I was cuffed) or if he was going to ticket me for that, too.

    Anyway, to the extent there is a point to this, if I had been black I would have assumed the cop was racist. In fact, he was just a D-Bag. Not to say that there aren't racist cops out there, as I'm sure there are, but I have to believe a lot of the perceived racism is just due to some cops being jerks.

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Scratch View Post
    Anyway, to the extent there is a point to this, if I had been black I would have assumed the cop was racist. In fact, he was just a D-Bag. Not to say that there aren't racist cops out there, as I'm sure there are, but I have to believe a lot of the perceived racism is just due to some cops being jerks.
    I think there's a lot of truth here. Thanks for this feedback. People naturally see what they want to see.

    This has been a fundamental dilemma for black Americans - do you object to racism when you (think you) see it? Or do you acknowledge that racism exists, and push forward, one day at a time, and choose to assume any given person you meet is fundamentally fair, and non-racist?

    My kids are mostly like Obama - they've grown up in a predominantly white area, and have really not encountered much in the way of racism. Obama came of age in Honolulu, and had an upbringing that gave him positive self-esteem.

    I don't think there's any way that Barack Obama could have become POTUS if he'd grown up in the South, or many big cities back east. He's been impervious to the subliminal stream of ill will and negative projections, from the warriors from a different time, like Mitch McConnell, apparently frustrating them, because he never cracked.

  10. #40
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    In my experience it is generally a bad idea to tell people they should not feel the way they feel. I think every black person I know feels at least a little uncomfortable around police officers and it seems foolish to me to say to them, "You shouldn't feel that way." All of them have experienced something like what Senator Scott describes, not once, but several times. I also know many LEOs, and not one of them is racist.

    Statistics do show (1) that Black Americans are not more likely to face deadly force from law enforcement than others, but that (2) they are treated differently than whites, and are more likely to see non-deadly force used against them in encounters with police officers. I'm thoroughly sympathetic to, and supportive of, LEOs and of the rule of law -- everyone who knows me knows that. Still, we need to find a way to give all our citizens confidence in those who are sworn to protect and serve them.

    http://www.npr.org/2016/07/14/485995...r?sc=17&f=1001

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  11. #41
    So after saying what I did I am reminded of going to Texas as a missionary. Up to that point I believed that the KKK was largely reserved for the back woods of Mississippi and was basically in hiding. To drive by the Koffee Kup Kafe and to witness a KKK march down a predominantly black street a few days later was shocking. I didn't realize that racism was alive and well.

    My observation in Utah is that if anything people try to overcompensate for other races that creates a different kind of awkwardness.

    For example, I was in some training in Park City. The guy doing the training was black, a very funny guy. He asks the question, "Okay name a celebrity who owns a house here..." Someone says "Michael Jordan." He pauses for a second and says, "The group before you said Tiger Woods, and the group before that said Dr J. Now I've been walking around town and I'm not seeing a lot of brothers here..."

    But racism in Utah is Ver real and shouldn't be dismissed. Don't believe it? Read cougarboard. So I hope I didn't come off as dismissive, just that as a teenager I experienced some profiling as well. I think I mentioned my Puerto Rican brother-in-law who gets pulled over every time he drives this beater pickup truck he has, but never when he is in a suit in his Toyota.


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  12. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    So after saying what I did I am reminded of going to Texas as a missionary. Up to that point I believed that the KKK was largely reserved for the back woods of Mississippi and was basically in hiding. To drive by the Koffee Kup Kafe and to witness a KKK march down a predominantly black street a few days later was shocking. I didn't realize that racism was alive and well.
    I lived in East Texas for three years as a child. My parents bought a house that was under construction and we rented until it was finished. One night, some idiot who was working on the house parked a trailer backwards in front of it. In the late hours of the night, a black man crashed his car into the trailer. Because it was backwards, the light reflectors were not facing him and he didn't see it until it was too late.

    In the morning, my mom came to the site to take a look. She asked another idiot working on the house if the man involved in the crash was ok. This moron says "why do you care? That (insert racial slur here, yes, that one.) had no business being in this neighborhood." My mom said "ummmm, excuse me?" and this guy explained that this was a white neighborhood and he shouldn't have been here.

    This was in 1993, so quite some time ago, but not the 60's either. What's funny is that most of my friends were racial minorities. As a mormon kid, I was blackballed from hanging out with most of the other white kids. One time when I was 7, a friends mom even asked me to leave immediately once she found I was mormon. Im not saying that this helped me know what other folks go through and face on a day to day basis, but it taught me that despite differences in skin color, we are all still people and should be treated as such.
    Last edited by UtahsMrSports; 07-17-2016 at 09:35 AM.

  13. #43
    Just wanted to say that I appreciate everyone's thoughts and perspectives here. I feel like I've grown as a person and learned a lot from reading everyone's thoughts on this, so I thank you all.

  14. #44
    Uhg, 7 more officers shot in Baton Rouge, at least 3 dead. This all needs to stop.


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  15. #45
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    Uhg, 7 more officers shot in Baton Rouge, at least 3 dead. This all needs to stop.


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    I have no words.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  16. #46
    Grateful my brother is retiring at the end of the month after 30 years as a Dallas police officer. My parents are even more grateful. He's had more than his fair share of close calls over the years. Appears to be an historic summer ahead of us....and not in a good way.
    “Children and dogs are as necessary to the welfare of the country as Wall Street and the railroads.” -- Harry S. Truman

    "You never soar so high as when you stoop down to help a child or an animal." -- Jewish Proverb

    "Three-time Pro Bowler Eric Weddle the most versatile, and maybe most intelligent, safety in the game." -- SI, 9/7/15, p. 107.

  17. #47
    And another ambushed in Milwaukee, but he appears to have non life threatening injuries.

    Guarantee everyone will still be at work with me tonight. We're all feeling a bit more tired though these days.


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  18. #48
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  19. #49
    MJ's response is what I would love to see more.

    Dialogue and mutual respect is key. It's awesome to see places like Kansas City having a bbq so police and BLM folks can talk.

    But it's disturbing to see the national leaders of BLM put down the bbq and some go so far as to say they "eat pig, not with pigs".

    SLC has been on the dialogue route for some time. There are two or three separate groups who meet with SLCPD's admin on a biweekly basis.


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  20. #50
    So an interesting observation (to me at least) this week. My LDS Stake was coerced, err... asked to enter a float into the children's parade last Saturday. We of course supported because of past float trauma (I'll tell the story someday - I hate parades) and my little kids marched in the parade with our Stake and my son and I sat on the sidelines near the end of the parade.

    Because it was hot as hell, we found shade sitting on the steps of a building about 20-30 feet from the side of the road and a lot of people joined us there too. The kids kind of ran back and forth from the shade to the side of the road to see what was going on and then back to the shade. If something interesting came along all of the kids would run up. The crowd there was an interesting cross-section, because you had a mix of people of basically any demographic you could think of. Wealthy people, poor people, middle class, different ethnicities, etc. I think this was largely attributed to the fact that Stakes get assigned to do floats, and so you had people from upper-east bench, and people from Magna etc.

    Anyway, during the parade some people dressed silly on motorized scooters came by and stopped in front of where we were at and started waving at the kids. Nearly all the kids were excited and came running up to them or waved back. Then the motorcycle cops came along driving in their formations. It was actually pretty cool to watch. But what happened was they'd do their stunts and 4 motorcycle cops would pull off the side - up the road and behind them - to keep things safe. Then they'd rotate back in.

    A cop stopped right in front of the crowd of kids who were previously all happily waiving at the people on scooters. While he sat there he waved to the kids, but this time only about half of the kids waved back, and the rest kind of turned around and left angrily or sat there giving him dirty looks. I noted that it didn't seem to be divided by race, but rather by (my perceived) income level. I found that fascinating. The cop was good about it, he kept smiling and waving at the kids who were giving him dirty looks.

    I'm not claiming anything, nor saying that those kids reactions weren't based on something real (like cops treating poor people differently than wealthy people), but it seemed clear to me that all of these kids had learned something from their parents. To the wealthy kids the cop was a friend, to the poor he was an enemy, or at the very least someone that couldn't be trusted.

    Fixing all of this is going to take some time (generations even) and some real coming together and not just by racial boundaries. But when kids are taught and/or learn to hate cops, that is a hard thing to fix. That is what is concerning to me about all of this, and I have to say I'm glad to see MJ's approach of trying to bring people together. That is going to be the only solution.
    Last edited by Rocker Ute; 07-26-2016 at 11:09 AM.

  21. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    So an interesting observation (to me at least) this week. My LDS Stake was coerced, err... asked to enter a float into the children's parade last Saturday. We of course supported because of past float trauma (I'll tell the story someday - I hate parades) and my little kids marched in the parade with our Stake and my son and I sat on the sidelines near the end of the parade.

    Because it was hot as hell, we found shade sitting on the steps of a building about 20-30 feet from the side of the road and a lot of people joined us there too. The kids kind of ran back and forth from the shade to the side of the road to see what was going on and then back to the shade. If something interesting came along all of the kids would run up. The crowd there was an interesting cross-section, because you had a mix of people of basically any demographic you could think of. Wealthy people, poor people, middle class, different ethnicities, etc. I think this was largely attributed to the fact that Stakes get assigned to do floats, and so you had people from upper-east bench, and people from Magna etc.

    Anyway, during the parade some people dressed silly on motorized scooters came by and stopped in front of where we were at and started waving at the kids. Nearly all the kids were excited and came running up to them or waved back. Then the motorcycle cops came along driving in their formations. It was actually pretty cool to watch. But what happened was they'd do their stunts and 4 motorcycle cops would pull off the side - up the road and behind them - to keep things safe. Then they'd rotate back in.

    A cop stopped right in front of the crowd of kids who were previously all happily waiving at the people on scooters. While he sat there he waved to the kids, but this time only about half of the kids waved back, and the rest kind of turned around and left angrily or sat there giving him dirty looks. I noted that it didn't seem to be divided by race, but rather by (my perceived) income level. I found that fascinating. The cop was good about it, he kept smiling and waving at the kids who were giving him dirty looks.

    I'm not claiming anything, nor saying that those kids reactions weren't based on something real (like cops treating poor people differently than wealthy people), but it seemed clear to me that all of these kids had learned something from their parents. To the wealthy kids the cop was a friend, to the poor he was an enemy, or at the very least someone that couldn't be trusted.

    Fixing all of this is going to take some time (generations even) and some real coming together and not just by racial boundaries. But when kids are taught and/or learn to hate cops, that is a hard thing to fix. That is what is concerning to me about all of this, and I have to say I'm glad to see MJ's approach of trying to bring people together. That is going to be the only solution.

    From 538, according to a new Harvard study:

    Take, for instance, a high-profile study released this month, though not yet peer-reviewed, by Harvard University economist Roland G. Fryer Jr. and covered in The New York Times and manyothermediaoutlets. It found that police are no more likely to shoot a black suspect than a white suspect in encounters in which using deadly force could be deemed justified — such as when suspects attack officers or resist arrest. The implication: Black people are shot at a higher rate relative to their population simply because they have more high-risk encounters with officers.









  22. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Two Utes View Post
    From 538, according to a new Harvard study:

    Take, for instance, a high-profile study released this month, though not yet peer-reviewed, by Harvard University economist Roland G. Fryer Jr. and covered in The New York Times and manyothermediaoutlets. It found that police are no more likely to shoot a black suspect than a white suspect in encounters in which using deadly force could be deemed justified — such as when suspects attack officers or resist arrest. The implication: Black people are shot at a higher rate relative to their population simply because they have more high-risk encounters with officers.




    And according to another article (NY Times) discussing the Harvard report, while persons of color receive more physical contact from police officers, there is no statistical difference between whites and people of color when it comes to being shot by an officer when the "victim" has not attacked the officer.

  23. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by Two Utes View Post
    And according to another article (NY Times) discussing the Harvard report, while persons of color receive more physical contact from police officers, there is no statistical difference between whites and people of color when it comes to being shot by an officer when the "victim" has not attacked the officer.
    So maybe what I'd like to see is a study along economic lines. One easy place to start as I believe domestic disputes go across all demographic lines is how often those escalate or where arrests occur. In other words when Lovey and Thurston Howell have a screaming match on the lawn, do they get tossed into jail less often than Archie and Edith Bunker?

    If my unscientific theory holds true it doesn't discount that blacks are disproportionally represented when it comes to police violence, rather they disproportionally are represented in poorer classes and that is another significant problem in itself.


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  24. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    So maybe what I'd like to see is a study along economic lines. One easy place to start as I believe domestic disputes go across all demographic lines is how often those escalate or where arrests occur. In other words when Lovey and Thurston Howell have a screaming match on the lawn, do they get tossed into jail less often than Archie and Edith Bunker?

    If my unscientific theory holds true it doesn't discount that blacks are disproportionally represented when it comes to police violence, rather they disproportionally are represented in poorer classes and that is another significant problem in itself.


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    Yelling doesn't get anyone arrested.

    Under Utah law any physical violence between cohabitants requires a mandatory arrest of the predominant aggressor. This da be an assault or damaged property during the course of an argument.

    Officers have no discretion, an arrest has to be made.

    The reality is socioeconomic factors are the biggest issue. But it's not in domestics etc.

    It's in not having insurance, registering cars etc etc. Those things then cause interaction with the police in traffic stops.

    The reality is many of the problems people have with police aren't actually a police issue. The issue they have is with the law, which the police are the face of.

    In an average year more white people are killed during police encounters. Those who post statistics often base them on the percentage of people killed vs the percentage of that persons race in society as a whole. The problem becomes who do police deal with? And that's a question no one can really answer

    If you look at the number of deaths that occur each year vs number of police contacts each year 99%+ of police contacts end with no such instance.

    The SLC Civilian Review Board's latest report indicates they average approximately one complaint of excessive force a month. That's just accusations, not founded claims. For perspective SLCPD officers have over 1,000,000 citizen contacts per year. (All internal affairs cases are routed to them and anyone can file their own complaint directly to them as well)

    I have zero doubt socioeconomic status plays a huge role. And that's where politicians should be focusing their time.

    And yes I have personally witnessed people at that very parade tell their children that officers in uniform are the "bad guys"


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  25. #55
    Officer Cody Brotherson West Valley Police Department was killed 11/06/16.

    He was attempting to spike the tires of a vehicle that was fleeing from police when the subjects hit him with the vehicle.

    Officer Brotherson was 25, he'd joined WVCPD in 2013.




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  26. #56
    Administrator U-Ute's Avatar
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    I saw the news reports and wondered how he was hit by a car. Sad news.

  27. #57

    An officer down in my neighborhood

    I'm sad to relay that Officer Jon Richey, the officer wounded in the encounter with the suspect who killed Officer Barney, was found dead at his residence this morning.

    SLCPD and the ME are handling the investigation. No signs of foul play.

    Jon retired from SLCPD about the time I got hired and went to work for UPD. He was one of the nicest people you'll ever meet.


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  28. #58
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    A Southern California story:

    Suspect in Whittier cop killing, East L.A. slaying was AB 109 probationer

    http://m.ocregister.com/articles/pol...-whittier.html

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  29. #59
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Feb 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
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    16,395
    This looks like a harrowing experience for the officer involved. I hope no one we know here ever has to go through anything like this.

    Video shows Bradenton officer fight off attacker

    http://www.fox13news.com/news/local-...46509237-story

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  30. #60
    Kudos Diehard and the rest of SLPD. Now if we can just keep the bad guys from shooting cops, we'd be golden.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...ushpmg00000009

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