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Thread: Life in the Trump Era, Part 2

  1. #481
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    The Journal’s Julie Bykowicz reported this week that the Pentagon is beginning to plan the big military parade ordered up by the president. He saw one in France during his state visit in July and liked it a lot. So we should have one too, perhaps on July 4, to honor the military.

    It is a ridiculous and embarrassing idea. If you want to show respect for the military make the Veterans Affairs Department work. A big, pointless, militarist display with gleaming weapons and shining tanks is so . . . Soviet. What do you gain from showing off your weaponry? What are we celebrating—that we have nukes? That we have to have them is a tragedy.

    “The abuse of greatness is when it disjoins remorse from power.”

    I see a line of thinking among those normally critical of the president that the idea’s a ten-strike: The people will love it, what’s wrong with it, who doesn’t like a parade?

    But I think people will see right through it.

    If there’s a parade that purports to honor our military men and women, they will go. But they’re not stupid, they’ll know what it is. It is Trump being Trump, and obsessing the nation. It’s bread and circuses.

    And it is not like us, at least the old and honored us.
    Well said.

    I Love a Parade, but Not This One

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/i-love-...one-1518135401

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  2. #482
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    Well said.

    I Love a Parade, but Not This One

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/i-love-...one-1518135401
    It is a little tragic and a little bit hilarious that this guy is our president.

  3. #483
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    Well said.

    I Love a Parade, but Not This One

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/i-love-...one-1518135401
    Along those lines, member of Congress actually claimed a parade in Washington would be good training for the soldiers who drive tanks.

    An M1-A2 isn’t difficult to drive down a street. In fact it can do 60 mph and destroy a tank with its main gun and not break a sweat.....parade waves are easy.


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  4. #484
    With Kelly starting to take heat for being "spectacularly tone deaf" - as one of his subordinates in the Marines put it - if they go through with this parade, it would be good for the Dems if there was a simultaneous Women's March, with the #MeToo movement picking up the physical abuse angle, to go along with the sexual assault issue.

    It's easy to think of the parade idea of Trump just being an infant who wants to better N Korea and Putin's parade performance, but it could also be part of trying to cultivate the nation for authoritarian rule.

    Why not use the money for the parade to buttress our voting systems against another cyber assault? http://www.businessinsider.com/russi...lection-2018-2

  5. #485
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    I will believe until my dying day that the Obama Administration was imbued with the gestalt of Chicago-style politics, through and through. Not to the level of corruption, for the most part (Fast and Furious and the IRS scandal come to mind) but as a general guiding philosophy and attitude. Remember when he told the GOP leadership "I won," as a not-so-subtle means of telling them to shut up and take their medicine.

    Look, I have friends who live in Chicago who learned not to make their political affiliation clear unless they were Democrats, or the trees on their street would not be trimmed. Other friends who donated to Rahm Emanuel (His Honor) got quick responses to everything from trash pickup to snow removal. It's just the Chicago Way. That's where Pres. Obama came of age politically. It's no surprise that he adopted a philosophy that is at least influenced by that. Remember how he got elected to the Senate? His campaign got hold of some juicy court records from his opponent's divorce. Hardball. The smooth-talking, urbane sophistication did a great job of masking that, but he's a tough guy. You don't get elected to anything in Chicago if you're not a tough person.
    Its official: you have gone full Breitbart.

  6. #486
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by concerned View Post
    Its official: you have gone full Breitbart.
    I'll cop to full National Review and full Wall Street Journal unsigned editorials.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  7. #487
    Administrator U-Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    I'll cop to full National Review and full Wall Street Journal unsigned editorials.
    Gateway rags to Breitbart.

  8. #488
    Quote Originally Posted by U-Ute View Post
    Gateway rags to Breitbart.
    Same drivel, but with more pseudoprofundity.

  9. #489
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthwestUteFan View Post
    Same drivel, but with more pseudoprofundity.
    Drivel? DRIVEL?!?!! Those are fighting words, you commie!

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  10. #490
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Only tangentially relevant to Trump but really interesting. Russia’s a problem again. I miss the days of Boris Yeltsin. Although he had his problems, at least he wanted to be a cooperative member of the community of nations.

    U.S. Spies, Seeking to Retrieve Cyberweapons, Paid Russian Peddling Trump Secrets

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/02/0...ssian.html?m=1

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  11. #491
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    More “drivel” from NR:

    Let’s take the second lesson first. All too many Democrats seem constitutionally incapable of mounting a proportionate response to the day’s news. Everything is a crisis, and the rhetoric is constantly pushed to the limits. It’s one thing to react with outrage when Trump equivocates after the Charlottesville terrorist attack and declares that there were fine people on both sides, or when he takes to Twitter to launch personal insults at “Little Rocket Man.” It’s another thing entirely to describe, as Nancy Pelosi did, a completely normal GOP tax plan as the worst bill ever to come out of the House. It’s another thing to claim that Americans will die if conventional Republican policies pass.

    Democrats still haven’t understood the extent to which their constant over-the-top attacks on men such as Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan inured the GOP public to further claims of racism, sexism, and xenophobia. So they go back to the same well, declaring that this time they really mean it, this time there really are racists on the loose.

    Yes, both parties have a problem with proportionate response, as the GOP’s stunning overreaction to the so-called FISA-gate brouhaha illustrates, but the result is a kind of endless public screaming, an unmodulated howl that drowns out truth, equalizes the two sides, and renders nothing truly outrageous or disqualifying even as partisans try to claim that everything’s an emergency.

    And that brings us to the first lesson: Be better. Talk to most Democrats, and they’re simply flabbergasted that so many Americans did not see Hillary Clinton as possessing the slightest character advantage over Donald Trump. And why would they? The differences often boiled down to style and manners. Trump’s blunt style bludgeoned the truth to death with a verbal hammer. Hillary’s sophistication sliced the truth to ribbons with a verbal scalpel. Either way, the truth died.
    http://www.nationalreview.com/articl...xtremism-blame




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    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  12. #492
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    More “drivel” from NR:



    http://www.nationalreview.com/articl...xtremism-blame




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    Rhetoric? Like Trump calling a sitting president the founder of ISIS? Or Trump calling NAFTA the worst trade deal in history?

    Both parties do this crap.

    Party loyalty is what is killing American government (Utah is trying to make more elected positions party affiliated, they were shot down thankfully)

    Somehow everyone involved in politics somehow gained citizenship in the US of Democrats or the US of Republicans. Maybe someday they’ll remember they’re American.




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  13. #493
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    More “drivel” from NR:
    Bringing up Hillary is the drug that calms the conservative mind, in response to the tuggings on the conscience regarding Trump and how so many Republicans have shelved their previously stated beliefs.. "Ah yes, well... it could be worse, so our amnesia about our previous values is justified".

    This morning I watched Hugh Hewitt's show on MSNBC(!) as he interviewed Reince Preibus. These two are very calm, the opposite of Hannity.

    Hugh casually noted that Trump's cabinet is the most conservative in history, and Preibus smiled, saying he was most proud of his role in assembling the cabinet. (For any traditional conservatives watching, this is like taking another hit on the bong. Beyond his shortcomings or even "alarming" behavior or rhetoric, remembering that Trump is providing the ideal laboratory for deeply held conservative beliefs erases concerns about (perceived) moral shortcomings or wince-producing style, and brings a mild euphoria.)

    The next segment after Hugh, they talked about the news of the day: Utah Republican Rob Porter beating up two wives and John Kelly's awkward changing of explanations, given the knowledge he had to know the FBI had knock-out objections to his security clearance, and Trump's claiming "He (Porter) says he's innocent", which is the blanket exoneration in the Trumpiam prism on issues.

    "Can we talk about Hillary again, and ooooohhhh, baby, baby.... let's talk about that most conservative cabinet, or maybe contemplate the meaning of Gorsuch"... as the sound of bubbles coming from the Conservative Bong helps ease the conscience, and changes the subject.

  14. #494
    Quote Originally Posted by Diehard Ute View Post
    Rhetoric? Like Trump calling a sitting president the founder of ISIS?
    The amazing thing is few remember that incendiary accusation. It's lost in a sea of equal or worse. "Ah, that Donald, he's quite a character, huh?"

    If Democrats were to retake the House, investigating Melania's (apparent) breaking of immigration laws - starting fashion shoots immediately after arriving on a tourist visa - would be a Ken Starr kind of move.

    Part of me thinks we need to try and get the country back onto some kind of reasonable, rational path of bipartisanship. The other part thinks that if you don't fight fire with fire, you're going to get pummeled. Ultimately, I think/hope most Americans are sick of what's become of American politics and centrists in both parties can together marginalize the extremists on both sides.

    This oscillating back and forth in Administrations is corrosive to the nation, is a horrible example to our youth, and could (conceivably) lead to a breakup of the nation, or possibly an extended suspension of elections. (We're not that far away from that. A poll last year suggested half of Republicans would be fine if Trump suspended elections.)
    Last edited by Ma'ake; 02-10-2018 at 09:34 AM.

  15. #495

    Life in the Trump Era, Part 2

    I think you both missed the point though. While I’m the first to admit that both parties are guilty of hysteria over the mundane, this article reflects what I’ve said multiple times. The hysteria over everything has become noise to the general public. I’m convinced it is a Trump tactic to keep us unfocused on the mess and the democrats are unwitting players. The entire thing is just like The Apprentice... stir things up and see what happens. It makes for great TV for the dimwitted (I have always hated ‘reality TV’). Is that any different than what we are witnessing?

    From a tactical standpoint they need to realize they are causing fatigue among the caring population. Pick an issue or two and beat it like a drum. The right is picking on the left’s inherent ADHD. Somebody get us a comfort animal.

    While disgusted by Rob Porter, I find myself barely caring about how the White House reacted because it is just more of the same. It is kind of embarrassing to admit that. But I suppose that is how most feel at this point.

    I can’t take another CNN editor-in-chief Chris Chilliza’s “34 point break down of what is REALLY wrong with Trump’s tweet today”. If you read CNN.com you know what I’m talking about and the first two or three are good points (that everybody already knows) and the rest is laughable and petty.

    But guess what, the good news for the left is I’m also not talking or thinking about Russia of sexual assault allegations. A win for chaos.


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    Last edited by Rocker Ute; 02-10-2018 at 09:38 AM.

  16. #496
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    Only tangentially relevant to Trump but really interesting. Russia’s a problem again. I miss the days of Boris Yeltsin. Although he had his problems, at least he wanted to be a cooperative member of the community of nations.

    U.S. Spies, Seeking to Retrieve Cyberweapons, Paid Russian Peddling Trump Secrets

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/02/0...ssian.html?m=1
    Besides being sharply divided and vulnerable to external manipulation, we also have a president who appears to view Putin as an ally / mentor, but unquestionably downplays the Russian meddling issue, and won't apply the sanctions passed by Congress.

    With the news that some states' voting systems actually were penetrated by the Russians, and numerous hacker contests showing how feasible it is to crack them, it would seem getting our electoral systems secured would be a strong bi-partisan priority.

    For Trump, addressing voting system security erodes his sense of legitimacy, so he certainly won't address the issue, and Republicans seem paralyzed to say or do anything, wanting to keep the President as calm and focused on their agenda as possible.

    In context, some Russian pseudo agent offering to sell video of Trump with a couple of hookers in 2013, while our agents are trying to recover Cyber Weapons, is really a very minor story.

  17. #497
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Rocker nails it. The author was not excusing Trump for his rhetoric, and I’m certainly not. It’s just that everybody seems too easily outraged these days and goes over he top in response. And Trump loves it.


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    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  18. #498
    Interestingly at the time we were all assured that hacking the election systems was simply not possible (always a dangerous challenge for hackers). I don’t think anybody in IT actually believed it.


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  19. #499
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    Rocker nails it. The author was not excusing Trump for his rhetoric, and I’m certainly not. It’s just that everybody seems too easily outraged these days and goes over he top in response. And Trump loves it.
    So, what's the proper response? Disinterest?

    One of my colleagues (an American) coined a term I'm trying to follow (today's posts not withstanding): "Assertively Managed Ignorance", ie, "AMI is your friend".

    Another colleague is having immigration problems, a technical snag on getting a green card, and is pretty freaked out about it. (I don't think it's nefarious, but I'm not in that situation.)

    I overheard other foreign colleagues try to ease her anxiety, pointing out other options, such as Pierre Trudeau's campaign to attract Biotech & IT companies to Canada, where immigration is not nearly as hostile, and is a key strategy in the development of the nation. We've had a couple of researchers go to Australia, where their government is doing the same thing. I heard a couple of American colleagues hoping Amazon chooses Toronto for their 2nd main campus, not to punish anyone, but (they hope) as a counter-balance to what they see Trump trying to do.

    None of this signals the imminent demise of the US, certainly, but there's an unquestionable unease among many.

    I need to steer toward sports & other topics more. (Duh)

  20. #500
    Quote Originally Posted by Ma'ake View Post
    So, what's the proper response? Disinterest?
    Absolutely. Outrage is soul poison. Imagine how much time you can free up by ignoring all these things you can't change.

  21. #501
    Quote Originally Posted by sancho View Post
    Absolutely. Outrage is soul poison. Imagine how much time you can free up by ignoring all these things you can't change.
    Ignoring things is what got us Trump in office. Too many people ignored the election assuming Trump couldn’t win.


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  22. #502
    Quote Originally Posted by Diehard Ute View Post
    Ignoring things is what got us Trump in office. Too many people ignored the election assuming Trump couldn’t win.
    I disagree, but, then, I wasn't really paying attention

  23. #503
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Life in the Trump Era, Part 2

    Quote Originally Posted by Diehard Ute View Post
    Ignoring things is what got us Trump in office. Too many people ignored the election assuming Trump couldn’t win.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    You’re missing the point. Trump did not win because not enough people were outraged. The quote from the David French article I linked to pretty much expresses the way I see it. People on the left were calling Mitt Romney a fascist, and Joe Biden was saying Romney would “put y’all back in chains.“ Ridiculous hyperbole. And it is still going on. Instead of talking about how to make things better, we’re talking about how a perfectly rational tax bill (which I don’t like) is going to kill people. If you cry wolf all the time, your arguments run out of steam.


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    Last edited by LA Ute; 02-10-2018 at 05:14 PM.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  24. #504
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    You’re missing the point. Trump did not win because not enough people were outraged. The quote from the David French article I linked to pretty much expresses the way I see it. People on the left were calling Mitt Romney a fascist, and Joe Biden was saying Romney would “put y’all back in chains.“ ridiculous hyperbole. And it still going on. Instead of talking about how to make things better, we’re talking about how a perfectly rational tax bill is going to end up killing people. If you cry wolf all the time, your arguments run out of steam.
    So, Trump is the real wolf, but it's the Democrats' fault?

    About the rationality of the tax bill, we may be finding out sooner than later if that's true. The just passed defense funding appropriations were for ~$715B, where the Trump Administration requested $650B.

    "Come on, Laffer Curve. Come on, Lucky Laffer Curve!"

  25. #505
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Life in the Trump Era, Part 2

    Quote Originally Posted by Ma'ake View Post
    So, Trump is the real wolf, but it's the Democrats' fault? 😉

    About the rationality of the tax bill, we may be finding out sooner than later if that's true. The just passed defense funding appropriations were for ~$715B, where the Trump Administration requested $650B.

    "Come on, Laffer Curve. Come on, Lucky Laffer Curve!"
    It’s perfectly reasonable to debate the pros and cons of the tax bill. I am not a fan of it myself, and I have said so many times. But at least you’re not saying that poor people will die because of it.

    Look, Trump is easy to attack and deserves most of it. I think we’d be better off if people on the left would choose more carefully what to go ballistic about.

    Take a look at the French piece. He argues that both parties need to be better at this.


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    Last edited by LA Ute; 02-10-2018 at 05:25 PM.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  26. #506
    Quote Originally Posted by Ma'ake View Post
    So, what's the proper response?
    The proper response from Democrats needs to be a coherent and well articulated platform for the mid-terms in 2018 and the general election in 2020. Not every solution needs to have a winner and a loser. Bashing Trump and waiving your arms around in hysteria will not take the day. We lack leadership. We have no real leaders. Neither party has a leader worth his/her weight in salt. We have elected officials who wet their finger and put it in the air to see which way the wind is blowing and then run to get to the head of that line.

  27. #507
    Quote Originally Posted by UTEopia View Post
    The proper response from Democrats needs to be a coherent and well articulated platform for the mid-terms in 2018 and the general election in 2020. Not every solution needs to have a winner and a loser. Bashing Trump and waiving your arms around in hysteria will not take the day. We lack leadership. We have no real leaders. Neither party has a leader worth his/her weight in salt. We have elected officials who wet their finger and put it in the air to see which way the wind is blowing and then run to get to the head of that line.
    I agree. In "normal" politics, if you don't counterattack, you're defined by your attackers. Running against Trump might present the opportunity to rise above that, to bypass arguing with him, because with a majority of voters, Trump's credibility is non-existent, because he contradicts himself multiple times... on the same issue.

    In a debate in 2020, a candidate could simply respond to Trump with "we can and must do better".
    Last edited by Ma'ake; 02-10-2018 at 07:02 PM.

  28. #508
    The same Russian Intel group that hacked the DNC is hacking US defense contractors: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/techn...se-contractors

    Based on his skipping the sanctions against Russia that Congress passed with overwhelming majorities, I don't think Trump will lift a finger to do anything about it.

    Only sustained attacks on Trump himself would anger him enough to change his mind that Russia is a key ally now, and the Russians aren't stupid enough to do that.

    (I have confidence that Mattis and maybe McMaster will try to defend against these kind of attacks within the context they're trained to serve the nation, but if Putin complained to Trump, he might order them to relent, in the spirit of cooperating and joining forces to defeat ISIS, or whatever.)

    Here's the link about Dutch Intel sharing their findings about the physical office where Cozy Bear (the peer organization to Fancy Bear) operated from: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.4c4192cf9691

    What are the chances the Dutch - and other historic allies - are willing to share this type of Intel coup with US, now?
    Last edited by Ma'ake; 02-10-2018 at 07:26 PM.

  29. #509
    Quote Originally Posted by Ma'ake View Post
    I agree. In "normal" politics, if you don't counterattack, you're defined by your attackers. Running against Trump might present the opportunity to rise above that, to bypass arguing with him, because with a majority of voters, Trump's credibility is non-existent, because he contradicts himself multiple times... on the same issue.

    In a debate in 2020, a candidate could simply respond to Trump with "we can and must do better".
    Any candidate who can do that will go a long way to getting my vote. Currently My base requirement for a candidate I can support is the person is an adult. Currently nobody has stepped to the plate. Schumer, Pelosi and Warren are winning points for their opposition to Trump by their base, but I think by the populace are viewed as another side of the same coin. I wouldn’t disagree.

    Right now should be the time for getting the up and coming Democratic contender in the ring and I just haven’t seen anyone yet. I am fearful that Trump might easily roll to a second term.


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  30. #510
    Administrator U-Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    Interestingly at the time we were all assured that hacking the election systems was simply not possible (always a dangerous challenge for hackers). I don’t think anybody in IT actually believed it.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I heard a great quote about computer security today from the Security Now podcast: It is so complex now that if you have any kind of computer on the internet (especially IoT devices), that if anyone really really wants to get into it, they will.

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