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Thread: Life in the Trump Era, Part 2

  1. #1321

  2. #1322
    Administrator U-Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    That would be an impeachable offense.
    We'd just add it to his list.

  3. #1323
    I finished Bob Woodward's Fear the other day. Anyone else read it yet? Anyone else plan to? I recommend it.

    I've read many of Woodward's books, particularly the four on Bush 43 and the two on Obama. The books are worth reading because of the amazing access the author gets, and if you go in with an open mind you are likely to find out that how you perceived the events being written about was not entirely accurate.
    "It'd be nice to please everyone but I thought it would be more interesting to have a point of view." -- Oscar Levant

  4. #1324
    Elizabeth Warren releases results of DNA test - looks like she is correct in asserting Native American ancestry: https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/pol...SVO/story.html

    On the specific issue, this won't change the minds of partisans, but it bolster's Warren's stand-up-to-the-bully credentials, and besides creating a cottage industry of DNA deniers, it will prompt the Trump tribe to look elsewhere for ammunition, ie, she is a "shrill", "angry woman", etc.

    More than anything, this does signal that Warren is seriously considering a run. She doesn't have the baggage Hillary had, but in terms of who would be a first woman president (from the Dem tribe) I still think the nation needs some calm, rational leadership in the mold of Amy Klobuchar.

  5. #1325
    Quote Originally Posted by Ma'ake View Post
    Elizabeth Warren releases results of DNA test - looks like she is correct in asserting Native American ancestry: https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/pol...SVO/story.html

    On the specific issue, this won't change the minds of partisans, but it bolster's Warren's stand-up-to-the-bully credentials, and besides creating a cottage industry of DNA deniers, it will prompt the Trump tribe to look elsewhere for ammunition, ie, she is a "shrill", "angry woman", etc.

    More than anything, this does signal that Warren is seriously considering a run. She doesn't have the baggage Hillary had, but in terms of who would be a first woman president (from the Dem tribe) I still think the nation needs some calm, rational leadership in the mold of Amy Klobuchar.
    These women both seem fine as far as political lifers from ivy league colleges go. Nothing special, but not disastrous. One would hope that we could do better, but one also knows we could do much worse. I don't think Klobuchar will run. Or, if she runs, I don't think she would secure the nomination. Just not famous/flashy enough.

  6. #1326
    Quote Originally Posted by Ma'ake View Post
    Elizabeth Warren releases results of DNA test - looks like she is correct in asserting Native American ancestry: https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/pol...SVO/story.html

    On the specific issue, this won't change the minds of partisans, but it bolster's Warren's stand-up-to-the-bully credentials, and besides creating a cottage industry of DNA deniers, it will prompt the Trump tribe to look elsewhere for ammunition, ie, she is a "shrill", "angry woman", etc.

    More than anything, this does signal that Warren is seriously considering a run. She doesn't have the baggage Hillary had, but in terms of who would be a first woman president (from the Dem tribe) I still think the nation needs some calm, rational leadership in the mold of Amy Klobuchar.
    I think Trump's attacks on her with this are childish and disgraceful but the test also says she has a Native American in her ancestry from 6-10 generations back, most probably 8. That would make her 1/128th Native American at best and 1/512th most probably.

    I'm actually 1/128th Native American as well according to DNA tests and genealogical records.

    I'll bet many on this board can likely claim a similar pedigree.

    I would never claim to be Native American as she has on her professional bio in the past. I don't think this bolsters her claim like she thinks it does.

    I fear with all of the candidates who are coming out of the woodwork that they are assuring Trump a second term. I don't view Warren or Biden as people who will get people to rally and cross the aisle. Amy Klobuchar would be preferable to those two.


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  7. #1327
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    I think Trump's attacks on her with this are childish and disgraceful but the test also says she has a Native American in her ancestry from 6-10 generations back, most probably 8. That would make her 1/128th Native American at best and 1/512th most probably.

    I'm actually 1/128th Native American as well according to DNA tests and genealogical records.

    I'll bet many on this board can likely claim a similar pedigree.

    I would never claim to be Native American as she has on her professional bio in the past. I don't think this bolsters her claim like she thinks it does.

    I fear with all of the candidates who are coming out of the woodwork that they are assuring Trump a second term. I don't view Warren or Biden as people who will get people to rally and cross the aisle. Amy Klobuchar would be preferable to those two.


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    My wife is 1/64th Native American and looks like Warren (blonde, blue-eyed). We have joked from time to time that she and our kids should try to benefit from that in some affirmative action manner, but we never got beyond joking about it. This news (1) proves Trump is a boor (dog bites man) and (2) still makes Warren look silly.
    Last edited by LA Ute; 10-15-2018 at 09:38 AM.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  8. #1328
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    Amy Klobuchar would be preferable to those two.
    Sure, she's like Kasich.

  9. #1329
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    My wife is 1/64th Native American and looks like Warren (blonde, blue-eyed). We have joked from time to time that she and our kids should try to benefit from that in some affirmative action manner, but we never got beyond joking about it. This news (1) proves Trump is a boor (dog bites man) and (2) still makes Warren look silly.

    Not only that, but your wife hasn't tried to monetize it.

    http://www.latimes.com/local/califor...014-story.html

  10. #1330
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    This made me laugh.

    Human DNA has more in common with a banana than Liz has with native American.It's just science. https://t.co/C09hiq7Fc2
    https://twitter.com/OrdyPackard/stat...rc=twsrc%5Etfw

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  11. #1331

    Life in the Trump Era, Part 2

    Apparently the Cherokee Nation thinks Elizabeth Warren's claims are as ridiculous as I do:

    http://www.cherokee.org/News/Stories...rrens-DNA-test

    The first leg up a presidential candidate will have with me is the one who can rise above the nonsense and show the ability to restore the respect and decorum to the office of President. I'm disturbed by the people who are stepping up among the Democrats, it resembles what happened with the republicans that lead to the rise of Donald Trump.


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    Last edited by Rocker Ute; 10-16-2018 at 07:25 AM.

  12. #1332
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    The first leg up a presidential candidate will have with me is the one who can rise above the nonsense and show the ability to restore the respect and decorum to the office of President. I'm disturbed by the people who are stepping up among the Democrats, it resembles what happened with the republicans that lead to the rise of Donald Trump.
    No such candidate would ever make it through the primaries which are pwned by emotion.

  13. #1333
    Quote Originally Posted by U-Ute View Post
    No such candidate would ever make it through the primaries which are pwned by emotion.

    Brooks' recent column spoke about this. The elite, white civil war between the few most extreme conservatives and the few most extreme progressives is running the show.

  14. #1334
    Both of these are dead-on

    Garry Kasparov Retweeted

    And @Kasparov63 says the character that reminds him most of Putin is Tywin Lannister: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/book-party/wp/2015/01/28/garry-kasparov-on-his-next-book-and-why-vladimir-putin-is-like-tywin-lannister/?utm_term=.b65a603c1e9b …


    George R.R. Martin says the Game of Thrones character that most reminds him of Trump is Joffrey https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/16/t...f-thrones.html


  15. #1335
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    Apparently the Cherokee Nation thinks Elizabeth Warren's claims are as ridiculous as I do:

    http://www.cherokee.org/News/Stories...rrens-DNA-test

    The first leg up a presidential candidate will have with me is the one who can rise above the nonsense and show the ability to restore the respect and decorum to the office of President. I'm disturbed by the people who are stepping up among the Democrats, it resembles what happened with the republicans that lead to the rise of Donald Trump.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  16. #1336
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    As a non-Trump fan I found this Lance Morrow piece persuasive:

    *****

    We’ve Grown Accustomed to Trump

    It’s hard to prove intangibles, harder still when they are in motion, like October clouds, moving rapidly across millions of minds.

    One obvious but neglected intangible is worth noticing in the weeks before the elections: The country—consciously or unconsciously—has gotten used to Donald Trump. Twenty-one months into his administration, Mr. Trump has been processed, or half-processed—even subtly domesticated—by the large, complicated American mind, which is improvisational and on the whole incoherent except in moments of national crisis.


    Even progressives to whom he is a monster treat him now as, at least, a familiar monster, another of the many disruptive, destructive realities of the 21st century. Life is a matter of learning to live with monsters. Mr. Trump hasn’t destroyed the world yet, as his enemies predicted he would.

    In fact, life goes on, much for the better in many neighborhoods. To progressives this is disconcerting—anticlimactic. The market is up. Unemployment is way down. North and South Korea are talking. The Mueller thing goes on and on, but who knows about that? It’s off the screen for the moment.


    These days, you only rarely see those psychiatric manifestoes on Facebook and Twitterclaiming that the man is psychotic or infantile. They were common in the first year of Mr. Trump’s presidency but the diagnosis loses its force when a voter reflects how psychotic and infantile the culture itself has become. Mr. Trump’s peculiarities don’t seem unusual when compared with the extreme bizarreness, not to say pathology, that is routine on the left.


    People get used to the strangest things, once the novelty has passed. Same-sex marriage, a preposterous idea not long ago, is almost everywhere accepted. The world adjusts to new conditions and factors in the Kabuki of opposition and ridicule. A monster may become a cartoon—the Tasmanian Devil. Alec Baldwin’s (never quite accurate) impersonation on “Saturday Night Live” has become part of the Trump routine now. People laugh, or they don’t laugh, but either way, they get up Sunday morning and go about their lives.

    Among progressives, contempt for Mr. Trump is an article of faith and hardly worth mentioning anymore at a dinner party. If you are dining with like-minded people, it’s boring to go on and on about the president; if those around the table disagree about him, it seems best to avoid politics altogether.

    Americans have given up trying to persuade one another, I suspect. Either their adrenaline is spent, or else they know from experience how dangerous the Trump-stirred passions are—how deeply enraged friends may become at friends, what carnage the spasms of emotion may cause. One tires of politics as road rage. Plenty of people remain almost crazy with anger, and the country’s political and cultural forces overall remain centrifugal, driving people to extremes. Yet civilizing and mitigating countercurrents are at work beneath the surface.


    The Kavanaugh confirmation fight clarified many Republican minds in advance of the midterm elections. It half-reconciled even many Never Trumpers to a president who has been so little to their moral or aesthetic taste. They have been driven toward Donald Trump by the Jacobin performance of the left, starting with the Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee and spilling into the streets among the Maxine Waters and George Soros Brigades.


    Familiarity and the passage of time may breed a certain kind of acquiescence, even grudging acceptance. We see a touch of Stockholm syndrome—conservatives who feel held hostage by Mr. Trump but are edging toward him nonetheless, forgiving his excesses in view of results. A lot of Americans feel they are held hostage by Mr. Trump. Sometimes the Stockholm syndrome amounts to a merely craven or opportunistic strategy for survival. At other times it may reflect a genuine change of mind, and even a conversion experience.


    My guess is that the variations on Stockholm syndrome will play a role in the minds of independent voters in the 2018 elections, producing a slightly friendlier inclination toward Mr. Trump, or anyway toward Republicans for whom they can vote without entirely approving of Mr. Trump. Such votes won’t necessarily express a conversion experience but rather a newly mobilized repugnance at political correctness, at (to a degree) a #MeToo movement that has run its course, or gone too far. Above all, such a vote will express a distaste for the Eric Holder “kick ’em” strategy and the screamers with enameled eyes.


    Progressives will protest that Mr. Trump and his followers have been violent gougers, kickers and thugs all along, and there’s truth in that. But life isn’t fair, as John F. Kennedy said. Richard Nixon complained for years that the Kennedy people played dirty and got away with it—even won the 1960 election by voting the graveyards in Cook County, Ill. And that was true, too.

    So Nixon—as if offering a model for the behavior of Mr. Holder and Ms. Waters years later—decided he would play rougher and dirtier than the Kennedys. It was thus that Nixon allowed his people to recruit “the plumbers,” who organized the dumb-and-dumber stunts that added up to Watergate, which cost Nixon his presidency.


    Democrats have now allowed themselves to be drawn into a similar error. It may cost them their opportunity to win the House or Senate. If so, it will have cost them whatever chance they might have had of fulfilling their fondest dream—the one in which they impeach Donald Trump and drive him and his kind out of Washington.


    Mr. Morrow, a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, is a former essayist for Time.


    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  17. #1337
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    From that communist newspaper* the New York Times:

    Why Many Native Americans Are Angry With Elizabeth Warren


    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/17/u...MhtY4YaAwBPL9Y


    Trump’s an idiot for using the “Pocahontas” slur. She’s foolish for trading on her questionable claims to Native American heritage.

    *John McCain used to jokingly call it that.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  18. #1338
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    From that communist newspaper* the New York Times:

    Why Many Native Americans Are Angry With Elizabeth Warren


    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/17/u...MhtY4YaAwBPL9Y


    Trump’s an idiot for using the “Pocahontas” slur. She’s foolish for trading on her questionable claims to Native American heritage.

    *John McCain used to jokingly call it that.
    Native Americans aren't the only ones.

  19. #1339
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Peggy Noonan:

    But in the end it’s about Mr. Trump, isn’t it? He is the living context and the constant question: For or against? He has had significant achievements—unemployment down, economy up, the courts, an imperfect tax bill that nonetheless got passed and was slightly better than what it replaced. No one seems to mention it, but America right now is enjoying prosperity and peace—or, if you prefer, growth and no new wars. It is a continuing amazement that with this the president can’t get himself to 50% approval, or his party in a better position.

    Yet of course it’s no mystery. He obscures his victories with his crazy. And so in the weeks before the election he rants around about “Horseface,” and compares MBS to Justice Kavanaugh, the victim of unproved allegations. He continues to rag on Attorney General Jeff Sessions: “I could fire him whenever I want to fire him, but I haven’t said that I was going to.”

    It is political malpractice on an epic scale and cannot be helped because he lacks self-command and is vain. He thinks nobody communicates like him. Nobody does. He thinks nobody breaks through like him. Nobody does!

    In the first 18 months of his administration, those who pointed out that he’d made a good decision, or failed to castigate him enough, were sometimes accused of “normalizing” Mr. Trump. But normalizing him wasn’t within their power. Only Mr. Trump could normalize Mr. Trump, by enacting normality and self-possession. He could have opted for a certain stature—the presidential stage, with its flags and salutes, almost leads you by the hand to stature. But he hasn’t.

    His supporters, especially Republican candidates, would love it if he’d put his arguments in the foreground, not his drama and weirdness. It is remarkable that he hasn’t cared about them enough to do this, to give them that kind of cover. He’s lucky the mainstream media hate him so much, and in showing that hatred stiffen his supporters’ loyalty.
    https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-long-...903970?mod=mhp

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  20. #1340
    Administrator U-Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    His supporters, especially Republican candidates, would love it if he’d put his arguments in the foreground, not his drama and weirdness. It is remarkable that he hasn’t cared about them enough to do this, to give them that kind of cover. He’s lucky the mainstream media hate him so much, and in showing that hatred stiffen his supporters’ loyalty.
    That and everyone is so focused on Trump's Crazy that nobody notices the crazy of McConnell or Georgia's Kemp.

    The GOP appreciates that much about him. I think that's basically why they tolerate him.

  21. #1341
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    “YOU CAN’T OUT-TRUMP TRUMP”: ELIZABETH WARREN SHOWS DEMOCRATS HOW TO LOSE IN 2020

    Warren’s maneuver stands as a warning sign for other presidential contenders. Getting into the mud pit with Trump—who doesn’t care about political decorum, rules, sexism, racism, name-calling, facts, or reason—has revealed itself as a sucker’s game. Like a scientist trying to argue with a climate-change denier, you’ll just end up drowning in a tide of bad faith.
    We are witnessing unconventional, asymmetric political warfare.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  22. #1342
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    From that communist newspaper* the New York Times:

    Why Many Native Americans Are Angry With Elizabeth Warren


    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/17/u...MhtY4YaAwBPL9Y


    Trump’s an idiot for using the “Pocahontas” slur. She’s foolish for trading on her questionable claims to Native American heritage.

    *John McCain used to jokingly call it that.

    this makes a little more sense, but not much: apparently some persons or groups were trying to get something with Warren's DNA on it to expose her, and she was trying to get ahead of the curve.

  23. #1343
    Remarkably, when these past few weeks should have been opportune time for the Democrats to shine, they seemed to have been able to compete with Trump toe to toe when it comes to silliness and general scumbaggery. Those entrenched in their sides changed nothing but certainly the independents did.

    Feinstein's mishandling of Blasey-Ford's allegations as a political ploy polarized the country and unwittingly undermined the #metoo movement.

    This was followed by the silly Pocahontas rebuttal by Warren that upset native Americans and other minorities and validated Trump's mockery.

    I'm very sad to say that if we stay on this path we are very likely headed to 4 more years of Trump and at that point I don't think our country will ever fully recover.


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  24. #1344
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocker Ute View Post
    Remarkably, when these past few weeks should have been opportune time for the Democrats to shine, they seemed to have been able to compete with Trump toe to toe when it comes to silliness and general scumbaggery. Those entrenched in their sides changed nothing but certainly the independents did.

    Feinstein's mishandling of Blasey-Ford's allegations as a political ploy polarized the country and unwittingly undermined the #metoo movement.

    This was followed by the silly Pocahontas rebuttal by Warren that upset native Americans and other minorities and validated Trump's mockery.

    I'm very sad to say that if we stay on this path we are very likely headed to 4 more years of Trump and at that point I don't think our country will ever fully recover.
    The two events you mention I think wash out, in general. The Kavanaugh process did permanent damage to Kavanaugh, Republicans, the Senate and the SCOTUS, but my hunch is Roberts will slide to the middle to replace Kennedy in the rulings, somewhat. (Roberts seems to care if the country comes apart at the seams.)

    I don't think Dianne Feinstein damaged the #metoo movement at all. If anything Trump has fanned the flames further since ("horse face!"), and Taylor Swift got more people to register in one plea that offset any increase in women who think the #metoo movement is a partisan hoax.

    Elizabeth Warren probably knocked herself out, which is fine with me. (Does the blowback she got mean it's now open season for the Klan to go after minorities in a race war? I don't think so.)

    There are multiple serious danger signs that the US may be slipping toward an explicit autocratic dictatorship - including the cold winds of recession enhanced by trade war that seem to be picking up.

    But there are also silver linings, beginning with millennials and offended women showing up in a few weeks.

    Trump is old, and not getting any smarter, though he can get a crowd worked up, regardless of what the anonymous OpEd and Woodward's book reveal about insiders looking to keep sanity in the West Wing.

    As to the future of America:

    My coworker brought her 7 year old son to work yesterday (courtesy of UEA) and he was telling me all about the 3 branches of government and separation of powers, knows something about every President. (LA Ute might be heartened and/or nostalgic & deflated, but the kid's two favorite presidents are Abraham Lincoln and Teddy Roosevelt.)

    He's a very bright little kid, clearly more knowledgeable about our Constitution and form of government than the President.

    Will American white nationalists chase him & his parents back to India? Hope not. I'd like to think not.

    We need to steer the ship away from some icebergs. We absolutely need leadership more in line with the Gettysburg address. (Run Amy, Run!)

  25. #1345
    How I think Feinstein hurt the #metoo movement is her politicalization of the accusation by Blassey-Ford which dragged her through the worst imaginable muck. I am not saying the right was not party to that too, but it could have easily been prevented had she acted in even a remotely ethical manner. I've had two women I know who are victims themselves say, "This is why women don't come forward." How many women swallowed that all back down deep inside after that shenanigan? At least Ford will get a book deal, I guess. Hardly payment but also a sight better than what every other victim will get.

    The continued support and defense of Feinstein is befuddling and perplexing. People of good conscience should recognize her for what she is.

    Meanwhile, HRC continues to defend her husband recently stating that his affair with an intern half his age was not an abuse of power. Also not a good look.

    The left had the opportunity to take the high ground on this and have whiffed at every level. Truly disappointing.


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