Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 91 to 97 of 97

Thread: The Russell Nelson Era: Changes in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

  1. #91
    Senior Member Scorcho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    right here, right now
    Posts
    1,323
    Quote Originally Posted by Utebiquitous View Post
    I'm with you as well - my international experience was terrific for me
    it was always disheartening when the attractive girl asked where you went on your mission and you mumbled some obscure state in the Midwest. She was already looking elsewhere for the missionaries who spoke French or Portuguese.

    What's it like to have pride in where you served?

    And deep, deep down I always thought maybe I wasn't smart enough to learn a foreign language or God didn't trust me to leave the country.

    I may or may not have some unresolved issues about this.
    Last edited by Scorcho; 03-12-2019 at 03:32 PM.

  2. #92
    Quote Originally Posted by Scorcho View Post
    it was always disheartening when the attractive girl asked where you went on your mission and you mumbled some obscure state in the Midwest. She was already looking elsewhere for the missionaries who spoke French or Portuguese.

    What's it like to have pride in where you served?

    And deep, deep down I always thought maybe I wasn't smart enough to learn a foreign language or God didn't trust me to leave the country.

    I may or may not have some unresolved issues about this.
    Missionaries called to English speaking missions were those who had already proved their valiance in the pre-mortal or pre-mission life. They had no more need for the refiner's fire.

    I may or may have not have already resolved personal issue about this.
    I saw a door that said exit only. So I entered through it and went up to the guy working there and said "I have good news. You have severely underestimated that door over there. By like a hundred percent." Demetri Marti

  3. #93
    When I was a teenager, my ward would occasionally have sacrament meetings where parents (usually moms) of all the missionaries out from our ward would basically give updates and share some of their missionary's experiences. It inevitably turned into a brag-fest about everything the missionaries were doing. I don't know if the moms were trying to one-up each other, but it sure felt like that.

    In order to properly decide who was winning, my friends and I (mostly) jokingly came up with with a test for weighing various accomplishments. You had to factor in how long the missionary had been out, if and when they became a senior companion, trainer, district leader, zone leader, or AP. Then you had to factor that by where they were serving, with the foreign speaking third-world countries getting the most credit, followed by foreign-speaking-first-world countries, foreign-speaking in America, foreign English speaking, and English-speaking in America, all in that order (although I can't quite remember the order for foreign English speaking and U.S. non-English). While we were joking around, it certainly showed how teenage boys preparing for missions viewed the different mission calls.

  4. #94
    Quote Originally Posted by Scorcho View Post
    it was always disheartening when the attractive girl asked where you went on your mission and you mumbled some obscure state in the Midwest. She was already looking elsewhere for the missionaries who spoke French or Portuguese.
    If it helps, my Spanish was not enough to make me attractive to the ladies.

    I did win the mission lottery though. I spent 1 year climbing around the Andes mountains and 1 year in Lima. I ate like a king (no other missions in the world compare to Latin America for quality and quantity of food), and each preparation day was like a new adventure out of National Geographic. I arrived in Peru shortly after the Shining Path terrorists were defeated. There was a solid decade of no North American tourism, so I was a total novelty/celebrity. It was a tremendous spiritual experience, but it was also an amazing cultural experience.

    As a nerd, there were 0 women in my classes at the U. As a senior, I finally decided to take something else just to see if I could meet girls. I signed up for French I, and of the 18 students, I was the only guy. It was a great class. In language classes, they pair you up all the time for practice. I got to know all the ladies...but I was still too shy to ask any of them out . The teacher was a grad student in French who had served a mission in Tahiti. I'm pretty sure she wanted me to ask her out after the semester ended, but, again, too shy back then.

  5. #95
    Quote Originally Posted by sancho View Post
    If it helps, my Spanish was not enough to make me attractive to the ladies.

    I did win the mission lottery though. I spent 1 year climbing around the Andes mountains and 1 year in Lima. I ate like a king (no other missions in the world compare to Latin America for quality and quantity of food), and each preparation day was like a new adventure out of National Geographic. I arrived in Peru shortly after the Shining Path terrorists were defeated. There was a solid decade of no North American tourism, so I was a total novelty/celebrity. It was a tremendous spiritual experience, but it was also an amazing cultural experience.

    As a nerd, there were 0 women in my classes at the U. As a senior, I finally decided to take something else just to see if I could meet girls. I signed up for French I, and of the 18 students, I was the only guy. It was a great class. In language classes, they pair you up all the time for practice. I got to know all the ladies...but I was still too shy to ask any of them out . The teacher was a grad student in French who had served a mission in Tahiti. I'm pretty sure she wanted me to ask her out after the semester ended, but, again, too shy back then.
    Was this 1985? I hiked the Inca trail right after the Sendero Luminoso (?) blew up the train to Macho Piccu. No Americans, but lots of Germans.

  6. #96
    Quote Originally Posted by concerned View Post
    Was this 1985? I hiked the Inca trail right after the Sendero Luminoso (?) blew up the train to Macho Piccu. No Americans, but lots of Germans.
    I should have written that there was a solid decade of no north american missionaries in Peru. I arrived in 1996, which is a year after the church started sending north americans there again. There were 120 missionaries in my mission, and only 7 were north american.

    When I say I was a novelty/celebrity, I was referring mostly to my status within the LDS Church.

    Callao is not a tourist city at all. It is a port city. The people there had not seen north american sailors for a long time. They had dealt with Russian sailors, though, and many people in Callao assumed I was Russian. I got called "Ruso" on a routine basis.

    By the time I arrived in Cusco in 1997, the people in Inca country were used to American tourists but still not used to North American missionaries. In every ward/branch I served in, I was the first American there in over a decade.

    Anyway, that's pretty amazing that you were there in 1985. I thought our tourism was basically nonexistent at that time.

    When I was serving in Ollantaytambo, my companion and I would try to guess the country of origin of tourists before talking with them. It was a fun game.

  7. #97
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    17,150
    Quote Originally Posted by concerned View Post
    Was this 1985? I hiked the Inca trail right after the Sendero Luminoso (?) blew up the train to Macho Piccu. No Americans, but lots of Germans.
    These assassinations probably had a lot to do with reductions in North American missionary activity in the country:

    Two Mormon missionaries killed in Peru

    This was 1990. I remember feeling shocked and very sad (not to mention angry). These victims were Peruvians, and it was the Shining Path that murdered them, but the year before two North Americans were murdered in Bolivia by another radical leftist group. The two elders were opening the door to their apartment when the killers shot them -- surely after lying in wait for them.

    Imagine being the families of those four missionaries.
    Last edited by LA Ute; 03-12-2019 at 06:56 PM.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •