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Thread: The Higher Education Thread

  1. #271
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UTEopia View Post
    LA, You probably ran with a different crowd than I did, but the students I interacted with in college and law school from 75-85, were pretty uninterested in education and general learning and more interested in the game of doing well in school. I would say that I fell into that category as well. I spent my first quarter at the U mostly interested in parties and girls, did a semester abroad in Israel through BYU (sort of an outpatient drug re-hab), did a mission (loved Spain), returned to BYU for a semester (too many rules), got married and finished at the U, went to law school at University of San Diego for a year and then finished at BYU (most boring people I ever met). The move from USD to BYU was financially motivated. While painting with very broad strokes, the most interesting and well-read group of students I interacted with were at USD. Unlike most of the people I interacted with at the U and BYU, they were more interested in the experience than the job at the end of the rainbow. Maybe the fact that there was a greater diversity of background and ideology gave rise to more robust and interesting discussions or maybe since few were married they just had more time and inclination to have coffee and talk. I have spent the past few years reading and in a very few cases re-reading the "great" books and trying to learn more than the 9th grade civics version of history. I try to read things written from different historical perspectives. It has been a rewarding and enriching experience. I'm not too worried about today's students. I don't think they are too different from my generation.
    Hey, I am in your same generation!

    Short summary: The U. once had a core curriculum required of all students called The Intellectual Tradition of the West, or ITW for short. It was considered ground-breaking at the time (1070s). There was a guy named Jackson Newell who was the Dean of Liberal Education and ran the ITW program. (I knew Jack well.) Since we live in a world that was shaped by those intellectual traditions, I think it is important for students who aspire to be educated to at least have some thoughtful exposure to those intellectual traditions -- warts and all (and there are plenty of warts). English majors ought to have some serious exposure to Shakespeare, even if it's just in a survey. Now that I think about it, that should be part of what used to be called "General Ed" requirements. They were called Liberal Ed requirements in my day. Students should know there was a guy named Socrates whose thinking was important to Western civilization, that there was a Renaissance, a Reformation, and an Enlightenment. Poli Sci majors (I was one) ought to know the thinking (Cicero, Locke) that influenced the American Founders. And so on. Maybe there has been too great an emphasis on "dead white males." If so, add some more diverse streams of thought, but don't dump the ones that are part of who we are as a society. No, not every student will be interested in ITW, but is should not be banned, de-emphasized, or dismissed as undesirable or not worth knowing about. I think it's important for the rising generation (or at least the intellectually inclined among them) to have a sense of who we are and how we got to where we are. They might disagree with what earlier generations said or did, but they should at least know what they said and did and why it's important today.

    That's all!

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  2. #272
    Taking a full year of ITW - three quarters - was a highlight of my experience at the U. Unfortunately, I couldn't get into Dr. Newell's class. I took it from Dr. Stephanie Pace. She made an incredible impression and difference in my life - the first teacher to really expect thinking from me. She also insisted on cogent writing. The class mostly kicked my butt as a freshman but it's the best butt-kicking I ever had.

  3. #273
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    Hey, I am in your same generation!

    Short summary: The U. once had a core curriculum required of all students called The Intellectual Tradition of the West, or ITW for short. It was considered ground-breaking at the time (1070s). There was a guy named Jackson Newell who was the Dean of Liberal Education and ran the ITW program. (I knew Jack well.) Since we live in a world that was shaped by those intellectual traditions, I think it is important for students who aspire to be educated to at least have some thoughtful exposure to those intellectual traditions -- warts and all (and there are plenty of warts). English majors ought to have some serious exposure to Shakespeare, even if it's just in a survey. Now that I think about it, that should be part of what used to be called "General Ed" requirements. They were called Liberal Ed requirements in my day. Students should know there was a guy named Socrates whose thinking was important to Western civilization, that there was a Renaissance, a Reformation, and an Enlightenment. Poli Sci majors (I was one) ought to know the thinking (Cicero, Locke) that influenced the American Founders. And so on. Maybe there has been too great an emphasis on "dead white males." If so, add some more diverse streams of thought, but don't dump the ones that are part of who we are as a society. No, not every student will be interested in ITW, but is should not be banned, de-emphasized, or dismissed as undesirable or not worth knowing about. I think it's important for the rising generation (or at least the intellectually inclined among them) to have a sense of who we are and how we got to where we are. They might disagree with what earlier generations said or did, but they should at least know what they said and did and why it's important today.

    That's all!
    I took 3 or 4 courses from Dr. Newell. He was one of the best professors on campus. I believe the ITW program ultimately morphed into the Honors program. My oldest daughter was in that and it gave her a different college experience in completing her lib ed requirements. She and about 50 others in her freshman class were admitted into the program and they took a curriculum taught by a variety of professors. Dr. Newell was one of the professors. The classes were structured for 25 students so you did not have those big auditorium classes.
    I ran into Dr. Newell at a hamburger shop in Sugar House a few months ago and told him how much I enjoyed his classes. My name is pretty easy to remember and he said that he remembered me, which was kind.

  4. #274
    Quote Originally Posted by Utebiquitous View Post
    Taking a full year of ITW - three quarters - was a highlight of my experience at the U. Unfortunately, I couldn't get into Dr. Newell's class. I took it from Dr. Stephanie Pace. She made an incredible impression and difference in my life - the first teacher to really expect thinking from me. She also insisted on cogent writing. The class mostly kicked my butt as a freshman but it's the best butt-kicking I ever had.
    I think the ITW series was the most valuable experience I had on campus, that and basic design in the Architecture Dept. ITW gave me the experience I missed being in Dr. Scanlon's regular English class.

  5. #275
    Columbia University MFA Students Demand Tuition Refunds

    https://hyperallergic.com/440469/col...tm_campaign=sw

  6. #276
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    This seems to be a very balanced account from the Chronicle of Higher Education. It is certainly thought-provoking.

    How a tiny protest at the U. of Nebraska turned into a proxy war for the future of campus politics

    https://www.chronicle.com/interactiv...te-of-conflict

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  7. #277
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    This seems to be a very balanced account from the Chronicle of Higher Education. It is certainly thought-provoking.

    How a tiny protest at the U. of Nebraska turned into a proxy war for the future of campus politics

    https://www.chronicle.com/interactiv...te-of-conflict
    Academics is all kinds of messed up.

  8. #278
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    The Ivy League Students Least Likely to Get Married

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...FdN6YgodpiEJmQ

    Princetonians like to marry one another.

    Although the university is coy about the exact number of Tiger-Tiger marriages, Princeton tour guides are often asked about matrimonial prospects, and sometimes include apocryphal statistics — 50 percent! Maybe 75! — in their patter. With an insular campus social scene, annual reunions and a network of alumni organizations in most major cities, opportunities to find a special someone wearing orange and black are many.

    People care about matrimony for good reason. Society has been profoundly shaped by what academics call assortative mating: the tendency of people to marry others resembling themselves....

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  9. #279
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Homogeneous: The Political Affiliations of Elite Liberal Arts College Faculty

    https://www.nas.org/articles/homogen..._elite_liberal

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  10. #280
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    This is not political, just a very interesting article in the Atlantic:

    The 9.9 Percent Is the New American Aristocracy

    The class divide is already toxic, and is fast becoming unbridgeable. You’re probably part of the problem.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/06/the-birth-of-a-new-american-aristocracy/559130/

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  11. #281
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Video worth watching:

    Universities, Education, and Free Expression

    Over the last several years, the debate over free speech on college and university campuses has become the dominant issue facing higher education. Reports of the implementation of university speech codes and trigger warning policies, commencement speaker "dis-invitations," and protests, many of them violent, over the views expressed by faculty or invited speakers have ignited fierce controversy from both the right and the left.

    Robert J. Zimmer, Ph.D., President of The University of Chicago, has emerged as a leading voice advocating for the freedom of speech and academic freedom on college and university campuses. In 2015, The University of Chicago released its "Report of the Committee on the Free of Expression" arguing that the "fundamental commitment is to the principle that debate or deliberation may not be suppressed because the ideas put forth are thought by some or even by most members of the University community to be offensive, unwise, immoral, or wrong-headed." This report, now known as "the Chicago Statement," has been adopted by 35 colleges and universities.

    In October 2017, The New York Times penned an op-ed praising Zimmer's efforts and calling him "the most essential voice in American academia today." Earlier this year, a Wall Street Journal op-ed dubbed The University of Chicago "the free-speech university."

    Join us as President Zimmer shares his thoughts on the continuing war of words facing college and university campuses.
    https://www.cityclub.org/forums/2018...ree-expression

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

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