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Thread: I taught in Church today

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by DrumNFeather View Post
    I'm up to bat again this week, and teaching on President Uchtdorf's talk: "Are You Sleeping Through the Restoration?"

    I've been trying to come up with some examples of counsel or what have you that have been given in talks recently in GC such as "Get out of Debt," "Beware of Pride," President Monson's Anger talk from a few years back.

    Do any other examples spring to mind?
    Doubt your doubts. What is the gist/premise of Uchtdorf's talk? Is it just about following counsel of general authorities or that changes to the structure of the church may still be forthcoming?

  2. #32
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    We are certainly hearing a lot about pornography these days. That really bothers some people, but whatever you think of the message it is significant that we are hearing so much about it.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Sullyute View Post
    Doubt your doubts. What is the gist/premise of Uchtdorf's talk? Is it just about following counsel of general authorities or that changes to the structure of the church may still be forthcoming?
    His talk is based on this idea of "Are You Sleeping Through the Restoration" He offers three reasons as to why...which I want to get to in my lesson. I was just looking for some examples over the years of things we've heard over the pulpit in the way of counsel that we may have "slept" through (such as Getting out of Debt).
    “It only ends once. Anything that happens before that is just progress.”

    Well, because he thought it was good sport. Because some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned, or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.

  4. #34
    I would say that Oaks' talk in priesthood addressing the Ordain Women was one of the more direct talks given in some time.

    I'm also teaching on Sunday. I got Epder Ballard's talk titled "Following Up." Such a boring talk.


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  5. #35
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrumNFeather View Post
    His talk is based on this idea of "Are You Sleeping Through the Restoration" He offers three reasons as to why...which I want to get to in my lesson. I was just looking for some examples over the years of things we've heard over the pulpit in the way of counsel that we may have "slept" through (such as Getting out of Debt).
    I am sitting on a boring conference call "just in case" I am needed. So I dug these up for you from the last two conferences:

    Family history
    https://www.lds.org/general-conferen...ry&view=topics

    Fellowshipping
    https://www.lds.org/general-conferen...ng&view=topics

    Scripture study
    https://www.lds.org/general-conferen...dy&view=topics

    Tithing
    https://www.lds.org/general-conferen...eaven?lang=eng

    Depression
    https://www.lds.org/general-conferen...essel?lang=eng

    Home teaching (President Monson on this one!)
    https://www.lds.org/general-conferen...herds?lang=eng

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    I used that talk (and the death of Robin Williams) as the premise of my lesson last week. It was a sober and somber lesson.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Sullyute View Post
    I used that talk (and the death of Robin Williams) as the premise of my lesson last week. It was a sober and somber lesson.
    I'm definitely going to mention it in mine.
    “It only ends once. Anything that happens before that is just progress.”

    Well, because he thought it was good sport. Because some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned, or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.

  8. #38
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sullyute View Post
    I used that talk (and the death of Robin Williams) as the premise of my lesson last week. It was a sober and somber lesson.
    I thought it was as ground-breaking as Pres. Uchtdorf's "Come, Join with Us" talk was.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  9. #39
    I spoke in church today . I was switched from 2nd counselor to 1st counselor. I was also the last speaker. I finished my talk with " to quote Joe Walsh: I cant complain but sometimes I still do. Lifes been good to me so far".

  10. #40
    I spoke in church last week and had an impromptu joke. I was talking about spontaneous moments to teach your children and how one time I was walking into the grocery store with my daughter and there was a man outside smoking. She said to me outside of earshot, "Dad, that guy is bad, he is smoking!" I took that moment to lovingly correct her and said to her, "That man isn't bad because he is smoking, he is bad because he is wearing a BYU t-shirt."

    Equal laughs and groans.

  11. #41
    Speaking of talks…..when the first speaker yesterday said he'd written many church talks in his life, but once reaching the podium had never used the prepared material, I had a bad feeling the wheels were gonna come flying off. I was right. Very, very right.
    “Children and dogs are as necessary to the welfare of the country as Wall Street and the railroads.” -- Harry S. Truman

    "You never soar so high as when you stoop down to help a child or an animal." -- Jewish Proverb

    "Three-time Pro Bowler Eric Weddle the most versatile, and maybe most intelligent, safety in the game." -- SI, 9/7/15, p. 107.

  12. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by mUUser View Post
    Speaking of talks…..when the first speaker yesterday said he'd written many church talks in his life, but once reaching the podium had never used the prepared material, I had a bad feeling the wheels were gonna come flying off. I was right. Very, very right.
    Do you have details? I absolutely love stories like this.

    You know, I love going to church and learning from other people. But every now and again, a real trainwreck talk/testimony really makes my day.

  13. #43
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mUUser View Post
    Speaking of talks…..when the first speaker yesterday said he'd written many church talks in his life, but once reaching the podium had never used the prepared material, I had a bad feeling the wheels were gonna come flying off. I was right. Very, very right.
    I'd love to see a photo of the bishopric members' faces at the moment he said that.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  14. #44
    I taught my daughter's sunbeam class today, what a hoot those kids are.
    “It only ends once. Anything that happens before that is just progress.”

    Well, because he thought it was good sport. Because some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned, or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.

  15. #45
    Based on something Wally posted over on CS, I dug up BKP's "The Candle of The Lord" from 1982 and taught on that in EQ on Sunday. I very much enjoyed getting to read the talk and work through it in my lesson. We spent about 10 minutes alone discussing the concept of whether or not religion is a crutch and whether or not it is ok to use religion as a crutch.

    All in all, it was a very enjoyable experience...it was nice to be able to teach Packer without it being any of his more controversial content of the past several years.

    Thanks Wally!
    “It only ends once. Anything that happens before that is just progress.”

    Well, because he thought it was good sport. Because some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned, or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.

  16. #46
    My lesson in the Teacher's quorum was about how adversity can make us stronger. As the basis of my lesson, I used the 1980 US Olympic Men's Hockey Team. In comparing the US-Soviet battle, I mentioned that the upset was on par with UVU beating Duke in basketball. One of the boys in the class then added........"or Like BYU beating Utah at anything!" I had to stop the lesson, walk over to him, and give him a fist bump. Best comment ive ever had in a lesson.

  17. #47
    It's funny, but that is the story of the 'Rivalry' over the course of their lives (since 2000-2002). In a couple of more years, when those kids start college, they will certainly wonder what all the fuss is about.

  18. #48

    I taught in Church today

    Activity tools for today's primary lesson on Samuel the Lamanite. Take home message: the Nephites just needed more practice.



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  19. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Schr-Ute View Post
    Activity tools for today's primary lesson on Samuel the Lamanite. Take home message: the Nephites just needed more practice.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Nice!
    Primary is the best.

  20. #50
    A couple of weeks ago I got two new callings.
    1. Teach sharing time in Primary once a month. SCORE!!!!
    2. Teach GD every other week.

    Here's the first draft of my outline for lesson 33, 'a firm foundation' Hel 1-5
    Suggestions, comments and ideas are always appreciated.


    I like to write on the board an outline of the material to be covered, but then spend the lesson talking about 2 or 3 themes.
    Outline:

    • 1:1-13: Conflict over judgment seat, beginning of Gadianton Robbers
    • 1:14-34: Initial victory by Lamanites and their eventual defeat at a high cost
    • 2: Detailed account and commentary regarding the beginning of the Gadianton Robbers
    • 3:1-17 Nephite migrations northward, Mormon’s commentary on number of Nephite records
    • 3:18-37 Mormon’s commentary on righteous leaders and pride of the people
    • 4:1-10 Gains and losses by Lamanites
    • 4:11-26 Mormon’s commentary on the decline of the Nephites
    • 5:1-4, 14-52: Miraculous ministry of Nephi and Lehi
    • 5:5-13: Lessons from Helaman


    Theme 1: War and Peace
    Hel 4:8. Lamanites (and dissenting Nephites) take all of southern lands.
    Hel 4:9-10: Moronihah wins half back through wars.
    Why did all this happen?
    Hel 4:11 Wickedness and abominations (which are defined in vs 12)

    • Pride. (Source of them all)
    • Treatment of the poor (first one listed!) Plug for the muslim refugee meeting on 9/9
    • Spirituality
    • Murder, stealing, lying, infidelity

    Is the order of this list relevant?

    War doesn’t fully work.
    Hel 4:15-16 Preached to the Nephites, repented, continued battle regained ˝ of the lands.
    Hel 4:18-19 No more. Spent energies on maintaining the status quo.

    But something else does work.
    Hel 5:45-52
    Hel 5:52. Lamanites gave all the land back. Why?
    Hel 5:51 Gave up their hatred and weapons. Why?
    Hel 5:50 The evidence had convinced them. Why?
    Hel 5:45 Nephi and Lehi gave up the seats and taught them, and it changed them.
    When people learn to lay down their hate, they lay down their weapons.
    What changed them? Evidence convinced them. What evidence?

    • Leaders taking time to minister to other people, people who hated them.

    War is sometimes required, but let’s not forget the power of love.


    Theme 2: Lessons from the Gadianton Robbers
    ​Movies about things not being what they appear


    • Fight Club, Shutter Island, Planet of the Apes, Psycho
    • Why do we not see reality? How is reality hidden from us?
      • Need some examples….

    Helaman is a pretty dark book. It’s the beginning of the end.
    The people sin, there are wars, they lose their land, and struggle to regain and maintain ˝ of it.

    What is the natural human tendency? Natural man. And it's hard to be un-natural.

    Hel 2:8 Purpose of Gadianton was get power, by any means necessary (sounds like base human nature)
    What if we could be natural, and sin and plunder and murder, but not suffer the consequences?

    Or more subtle: What if:

    • We could pretend that everything was ok?
    • We pretend that our life was a Pinterest page?
    • Or that facebook was accurate portrayal of reality?
    • That our children were perfect?
    • That we didn’t have any problems?
    • That we have no doubts?
    • That all was well in Zion?
    • Or we believe all the pretending people around us?

    How different is this from what Gadianton was trying to do?

    • Hel 6:22-24. Elaborate system of agreements and oaths so that none of the “dirt” would be made public.

    Do we have an internal system to maintain this appearance?
    Are there systems in place around us? (families, work, ward, church, etc)?

    Hemingway: “We are all broken. That’s how the light gets in”

  21. #51
    I nearly got through my entire GD lesson yesterday without an election comment, but someone finally mentioned the protests, I pivoted away from that as quickly as I could.
    “It only ends once. Anything that happens before that is just progress.”

    Well, because he thought it was good sport. Because some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned, or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.

  22. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by DrumNFeather View Post
    I nearly got through my entire GD lesson yesterday without an election comment, but someone finally mentioned the protests, I pivoted away from that as quickly as I could.
    Hahahaha! Im glad you were able to get out of it.

    Every ward seems to have at least one of those folks who assume that everyone else shares their political views and bringing politics into a sunday school lesson is just the same as if you used Noah or Alma the Younger in a comment.

    Ill never forget one guy just going off one time about the liberals and how they wanted to 'kill off all the old people'. He was almost in tears he was so upset. Thankfully, the teacher was able to make him feel important and appreciated and at the same time say that rant was the end of the political discussion for that day and it was time to move on.

  23. #53
    I've been asked to speak in Sacrament meeting a week from tomorrow. My "topic" is "The Righteous Judge" talk by Elder Robbins from last conference. As of now, I think my focus is going to be with the "Visitors Welcome" sign in front of every LDS chapel and if we implement that invitation in our own lives. Do we use judgement to advocate for people or ostracize them. I'd like to spend some time on the refugee movement. Now building a collection of interesting examples and anecdotes. Feel free to contribute.


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  24. #54
    No church tomorrow. We got 2 inches of snow.

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
    "Be a philosopher. A man can compromise to gain a point. It has become apparent that a man can, within limits, follow his inclinations within the arms of the Church if he does so discreetly." - The Walking Drum

    "And here’s what life comes down to—not how many years you live, but how many of those years are filled with bullshit that doesn’t amount to anything to satisfy the requirements of some dickhead you’ll never get the pleasure of punching in the face." – Adam Carolla

  25. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Schr-Ute View Post
    I've been asked to speak in Sacrament meeting a week from tomorrow. My "topic" is "The Righteous Judge" talk by Elder Robbins from last conference. As of now, I think my focus is going to be with the "Visitors Welcome" sign in front of every LDS chapel and if we implement that invitation in our own lives. Do we use judgement to advocate for people or ostracize them. I'd like to spend some time on the refugee movement. Now building a collection of interesting examples and anecdotes. Feel free to contribute.


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    My wife and I had a brief conversation about judgement today. I doubt any of it will be helpful, but it has been bouncing around in my head today, so writing it out feels a bit cathartic.

    We were reading about the shooter in the Ft Lauderdale airport, including his background and apparent battles with mental illness. She asked, "can he ever be forgiven for what he has done"?

    We discussed that when we see something happen (or a person), we have a limited perspective. The amount of information we don't have far outweighs the information we do have. But that doesn't stop us from making an initial judgement. For instance, she texted me about the shooting when it first hit the news, and my first question was, do they think it was a terrorist, or someone with mental illness? My experience tells me that it is likely one of those two things. Others from different perspectives may have had different thoughts on the cause or motive.

    My wife had a brother who committed suicide a few years back due to depression. I mentioned to her that if she felt that he could be forgiven for taking his own life due to mental illness issues, then wouldn't that apply to this shooter as well? It's not an apples to apples comparison, but it is similar in that in both cases, we assume the person was not fully in control of their decision making or actions. But her emotions differ between her brother and this mass killer, so it was difficult for her to see the similarity.

    I guess we are all guilty of judging others in similar ways as well. We see their appearance, or hear of something they said or did, and ascribe the quality of person they are based on what little we see or know about them. Our emotions about the situation can magnify the judgement as well (if we feel threatened, injury, flattered, superior, etc.). I think it is natural to do this. It takes a higher level of emotional and intellectual control to reserve judgement until more information is available.

    I like the quote in SeattleUte's signature- "Be kind to all, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle". We can't see the battles that most people are fighting, we usually only see the scars they have incurred.
    Dyslexics of the world, untie!

  26. #56
    Chrisrenrut and Dwight,
    Chrisrenrut's post on judgement brought to mind a description Dostoevsky writes in "The Brothers Karamazov" of Alyosha. He writes, "...throughout his life he seemed to believe in people and trust them, and yet no one ever thought him simple-minded or naive. There was something in him that made people realize that he refused to sit in judgement on others, that he felt he had no right to, and that, whatever happened, he would never condemn anyone. He gave the impression that he could witness anything without feeling in the least outraged, although he might be deeply saddened.

    That struck me. I find myself aspiring to that kind of description - refraining from judgement, seeking understanding, practicing empathy and love for all.
    Last edited by Utebiquitous; 01-08-2017 at 10:55 PM.

  27. #57
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Alsyosha is one of my favorite literary characters.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  28. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Schr-Ute View Post
    I've been asked to speak in Sacrament meeting a week from tomorrow. My "topic" is "The Righteous Judge" talk by Elder Robbins from last conference. As of now, I think my focus is going to be with the "Visitors Welcome" sign in front of every LDS chapel and if we implement that invitation in our own lives. Do we use judgement to advocate for people or ostracize them. I'd like to spend some time on the refugee movement. Now building a collection of interesting examples and anecdotes. Feel free to contribute.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    One thing I focused on during my last lesson of 2016 in Gospel Doctrine was the idea that we often consider charity to be a physical act of donating time, money, etc. But I think it goes deeper than that, and if we are truly charitable, we seek to better understand where someone might be coming from, not fully understanding their circumstances. In any event, I think that is a possible angle that could be used in terms of judging others etc.
    “It only ends once. Anything that happens before that is just progress.”

    Well, because he thought it was good sport. Because some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned, or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.

  29. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by chrisrenrut View Post
    My wife and I had a brief conversation about judgement today. I doubt any of it will be helpful, but it has been bouncing around in my head today, so writing it out feels a bit cathartic.

    We were reading about the shooter in the Ft Lauderdale airport, including his background and apparent battles with mental illness. She asked, "can he ever be forgiven for what he has done"?

    We discussed that when we see something happen (or a person), we have a limited perspective. The amount of information we don't have far outweighs the information we do have. But that doesn't stop us from making an initial judgement. For instance, she texted me about the shooting when it first hit the news, and my first question was, do they think it was a terrorist, or someone with mental illness? My experience tells me that it is likely one of those two things. Others from different perspectives may have had different thoughts on the cause or motive.

    My wife had a brother who committed suicide a few years back due to depression. I mentioned to her that if she felt that he could be forgiven for taking his own life due to mental illness issues, then wouldn't that apply to this shooter as well? It's not an apples to apples comparison, but it is similar in that in both cases, we assume the person was not fully in control of their decision making or actions. But her emotions differ between her brother and this mass killer, so it was difficult for her to see the similarity.

    I guess we are all guilty of judging others in similar ways as well. We see their appearance, or hear of something they said or did, and ascribe the quality of person they are based on what little we see or know about them. Our emotions about the situation can magnify the judgement as well (if we feel threatened, injury, flattered, superior, etc.). I think it is natural to do this. It takes a higher level of emotional and intellectual control to reserve judgement until more information is available.

    I like the quote in SeattleUte's signature- "Be kind to all, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle". We can't see the battles that most people are fighting, we usually only see the scars they have incurred.
    Quote Originally Posted by Utebiquitous View Post
    Chrisrenrut and Dwight,
    Chrisrenrut's post on judgement brought to mind a description Dostoevsky writes in "The Brothers Karamazov" of Alyosha. He writes, "...throughout his life he seemed to believe in people and trust them, and yet no one ever thought him simple-minded or naive. There was something in him that made people realize that he refused to sit in judgement on others, that he felt he had no right to, and that, whatever happened, he would never condemn anyone. He gave the impression that he could witness anything without feeling in the least outraged, although he might be deeply saddened.

    That struck me. I find myself aspiring to that kind of description - refraining from judgement, seeking understanding, practicing empathy and love for all.
    I listened to a fascinating podcast last week. The podcast starts with a daughter interviewing her mother. 20 years after a traumatic event in the mother's life. One evening, 20 years ago, this woman was assaulting in her back yard by a man. She was taking into her home, raped repeatedly, held against her will, and eventually forced to go to several ATMs and withdraw much of her savings and robbed. The whole ordeal lasted 5 hours. This man was eventually arrested. Turns out this attacker had previously been convicted of being involved in a murder and served 20 years in a Pennsylvania prison before his sentence was commuted and he was released. In the 92 days he wasn't in prison, he managed the aforementioned attack, as well as two additional and similar attacks in which the women were both murdered.

    In the hour long podcast, the daughter spends 2 1/2 years trying to come to terms with all of the details involved. It addresses the decision to commute the original life sentence, it addresses the political careers that were destroyed and launched (Tom Ridge) due to this decision to commute, this daughter's decision to be involved in a special session to address crime which made future commutes nearly impossible, and now her decision and struggle to forgive.

    This story was originally posted to transom.org but it was really nicely packaged together on This American Life. It's not Sacrament talk friendly, but a fascinating picture of many consequences, intended and unintended, of passing judgement. I highly recommend taking a listen.

    https://www.thisamericanlife.org/rad...20-years-later

  30. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Schr-Ute View Post
    I listened to a fascinating podcast last week. The podcast starts with a daughter interviewing her mother. 20 years after a traumatic event in the mother's life. One evening, 20 years ago, this woman was assaulting in her back yard by a man. She was taking into her home, raped repeatedly, held against her will, and eventually forced to go to several ATMs and withdraw much of her savings and robbed. The whole ordeal lasted 5 hours. This man was eventually arrested. Turns out this attacker had previously been convicted of being involved in a murder and served 20 years in a Pennsylvania prison before his sentence was commuted and he was released. In the 92 days he wasn't in prison, he managed the aforementioned attack, as well as two additional and similar attacks in which the women were both murdered.

    In the hour long podcast, the daughter spends 2 1/2 years trying to come to terms with all of the details involved. It addresses the decision to commute the original life sentence, it addresses the political careers that were destroyed and launched (Tom Ridge) due to this decision to commute, this daughter's decision to be involved in a special session to address crime which made future commutes nearly impossible, and now her decision and struggle to forgive.

    This story was originally posted to transom.org but it was really nicely packaged together on This American Life. It's not Sacrament talk friendly, but a fascinating picture of many consequences, intended and unintended, of passing judgement. I highly recommend taking a listen.

    https://www.thisamericanlife.org/rad...20-years-later
    A while back I mentioned a woman I know who was raped and the DAs office opted not to prosecute and so the dude went free. Turns out he has not attacked a couple of other women and so now they want to prosecute. Terrible situation for her because now she is feeling guilt about the other women and wondering if she could have done more that would have protected them. She is also having to pick at these wounds she has worked hard to come to peace with. Terrible situation all around. Unfortunately that seems to be the pattern with rape.

    I can't imagine being the people involved in the commutation of the situation above, or the inept prosecutor in the SL DA's office having to manage and deal with those sort of situations and the guilt around them.

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