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Thread: I taught in Church today

  1. #61
    Thanks for all of the shared thoughts. I ended up at a different spot than I expected to, but I think that I managed to organize the chaos in my head fairly coherently. It seemed to be received well enough. I was even approached by a gentleman after the meeting who asked for a copy of it. He and his family were just visiting but his ward needed to hear the message. Pretty flattering. I cleaned it up a bit this morning so it better fit what I spoke and figured that I'd post it here, if anyone was interested. So at the risk of repelling the hundreds of bots trying to spam the site, here you go:

    Fifteen years ago, in a show of determined irresponsibility, I embarked on a journey. A two-month solo bicycle trip from Washington to Maine. The only goal was to watch the sun set over the Pacific and rise over the Atlantic. Everything in-between was TBD. To be determined.

    Before beginning my adventure, I did something that dumb people tend to do. I made a deal with God. The deal went something along the lines of, I will make every reasonable effort to not ride on Sunday, if God somehow made that possible. Over the next eight weeks, regardless of what small town along the US/Canadian border I found myself in on Saturday evening, there was an LDS chapel in every single one of them. Each one of those chapels had a sign, predominately placed to state two great truths: it was the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints AND that visitors welcomed. Without any assistance, all of my resources for the trip were contained in the 40-liter dry bag that I pulled behind me in a small trailer. Can you imagine the sight that I was after a week on the road?! But every Sunday morning, as I wandered in wearing cargo pants and a casual polo shirt, overly hairy and marginally disheveled, (can you imagine?) the questions were always the same: where are you from, where did you start, where will you finish, what can we do to help? I was offered a place to eat, a place to sleep, a place to refresh for the upcoming week. I triggered my own stranger danger and always wanted to reply, “are you sure that’s a good idea?” But I never felt judged for not meeting their cultural norms and I never cynically questioned the statement of visitors welcomed.

    As a social species, being part of a group is one of our most basic and strongest needs. In the anthropological record, man’s exit from the wilderness to till the fields changed the course of history. No longer were groups required to follow the herd nor limited in size due to caloric availability or the ability to keep up. We were now able to settle, develop and invest in the community. As these communities expanded from families to villages and beyond, a strange phenomenon began to take place. As our reach got wider and extended further, it started to incorporate those that weren’t quite like us. The birth of tribalism and eventually the protectionism of us vs them.

    As a biologist, I was trained in the process of phylogenetics: using physical and genetic traits to categorize and separate species and sub-species. The length of the primary feathers in a bird; the number of spines in the dorsal fin in a fish; the proportion of ear length to snout in bats. This is how we catalog the world. Too often, this is also how we catalog each other. The kind of car we drive, the color of our skin, our tax bracket, the party we vote for, the team we root for, the commandments we keep. These things connect us with our tribes, while simultaneously drawing the boundaries that keep the Other out. The things that make me a pretty good biologist also tend to make me a pretty lousy human being.

    While visiting the Nephites following his crucifixion, Christ counseled His newly called twelve that “Ye shall be judges of this people, according to the judgment which I shall give unto you, which shall be just. Therefore, what manner of men ought ye to be? Verily I say unto you, even as I am.” (3 Ne. 27:27) Perfect judgment requires perfect perspective. A high bar. Last General Conference, Elder Lynn G. Robbins of the Seventy taught that “the natural man and woman in each of us has a tendency to condemn others and to judge un-righteously, or self-righteously.” Our natural man uses judgment to isolate and ostracize. Christ-like judgement is used to advocate for. Christ’s judgement was beautifully captured in His words to the woman at the temple, “Neither do I condemn thee: go, and sin no more.” (John 8:11)

    Our judgment and condemnation of others is a reflection of our understanding of the gospel. We may understand the letters of the law, but overlook the spirit forgetting that by the law, we are all condemned. The scribes and Pharisees used the law as a weapon to protect themselves from the Other. We unqualify ourselves the moment we start keeping score.

    Christ wants us to celebrate all that come unto him, regardless of their history. I can't think of a lesson that he teaches more often. The parable of the lost sheep, the lost piece of silver, the prodigal son, the hired laborers. Each of these parables highlight the joy of the redeemed soul. The peace and happiness of the gospel can not be found when we constantly compare the statistics of our supplication to those around us. Do we turn our backs on the lost sheep and log in to social media to complain to the ninty-nine that "These last have wrought but one hour, and thou hast made them equal unto us, which have borne the burden and heat of the day?" (Matt. 20:12) or do we use it to send e-vites to the celebration?

    Even worse than the judgements that we place on others, is the truth that we’re even more susceptible to overly criticize and judge ourselves. In the Pearl of Great Price, we read of the moment when Moses was “caught up into an exceedingly high mountain.”

    And he saw God face to face, and he talked with him, and the glory of God was upon Moses; therefore Moses could endure his presence.

    And God spake unto Moses, saying : Behold, I am the Lord God Almighty, and Endless is my name;

    And behold, thou art my son; wherefore look, and I will show thee the workmanship of mine hands;

    And I have a work for thee, Moses, my son; (Moses 1:1-6)

    As soon as Moses was "left unto himself" and had a moment to collect himself, he concludes that "for this cause I know that man is nothing, which thing I never had supposed." (v. 10) I will forever fixate on the word "nothing" here. Our current definition for "nothing" undermines and conflicts the whole experience Moses had just endured. "I am God; You are my son; and there is a work for you to do." Moses was shown the whole history of the world. Nothing about that vision would indicate that Moses was insignificant. "Nothing" almost becomes the unspeakable everything. "Which thing I never had supposed." Moses was not perfect, but that did not change his divine genealogy. The same holds true for us. There is a God; we are His sons and daughters; He has a work for us.

    This church is 15 million plus members strong and reaches every corner of the globe. We live in a world full of conflict that has left millions of people without a home. People who may not sound like us, who may not look like us, who may be overly hairy and marginally disheveled. Refugees looking for refuge. It is certainly an overwhelming task, but we can make ourselves available. In April General Conference, Elder Patrick Kearon testified that "being a refugee may be a defining moment in the lives of those who are refugees, but being a refugee does not define them. Like countless thousands before them, this will be a period - we hope a short period - in their lives. Some of them will go on to be Nobel laureates, public servants, physicians, scientists, musicians, artists, religious leaders, and contributors in other fields. Indeed, many of them were these things before they lost everything. This moment does not define them, but our response will help define us." "Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me."

    Too often, we resist reaching out in fear that doing so will somehow take away from us. Pollute our perspective. But just as Christ described himself as living water, these lost sheep bring new experiences and new life to our stale homogeneity.

    Tomorrow we recognize the birth of the great Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. I would be remiss to speak on the importance of inclusion without including his words. In a slight paraphrase, when awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace, he spoke in part “I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of [judgement] that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality…I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word.” Christ knew the value of the lost sheep. The value of the Other. Until we understand these things perfectly - the way that Christ understood them - then it is our duty to welcome the visitor. Welcome them into our wards, into our homes and into our hearts.

    The saddest words in the history of the world were, “Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani? which is being interpreted, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” (Mark 15:34) A moment of absolute isolation at the apex of the atonement. It is our calling to ensure that they’re never uttered again.

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  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Schr-Ute View Post
    Thanks for all of the shared thoughts. I ended up at a different spot than I expected to, but I think that I managed to organize the chaos in my head fairly coherently. It seemed to be received well enough. I was even approached by a gentleman after the meeting who asked for a copy of it. He and his family were just visiting but his ward needed to hear the message. Pretty flattering. I cleaned it up a bit this morning so it better fit what I spoke and figured that I'd post it here, if anyone was interested. So at the risk of repelling the hundreds of bots trying to spam the site, here you go:




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Small world. Your talk just showed up in my Facebook feed. It is at least 4 people removed. But the 3rd person in the line had nice things to say about it:

    "Thanks to (name removed) for sharing this. I don't know the author, but he speaks beautifully with inspiration."

    edit: I really liked it as well. I was trying to figure out how I could plagiarize it without pretending to be a biologist.
    Last edited by chrisrenrut; 01-31-2017 at 08:19 PM.
    Dyslexics of the world, untie!

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by chrisrenrut View Post
    Small world. Your talk just showed up in my Facebook feed. It is at least 4 people removed. But the 3rd person in the line had nice things to say about it:

    "Thanks to (name removed) for sharing this. I don't know the author, but he speaks beautifully with inspiration."

    edit: I really liked it as well. I was trying to figure out how I could plagiarize it without pretending to be a biologist.
    That blows my mind. My wife asked me to post it on FB with all the crazy refugee stuff in the news and I've been taken back by the number of people that have responded to it.

    This last Sunday at church, I even had a gentleman stop me in the hall, thank me for the talk and introduce himself to me. Which was weird since we've been in the same ward for more than five years now and he acted like he'd never seen me before. I'm not exactly easy to miss.


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  4. #64
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Schr-Ute View Post
    That blows my mind. My wife asked me to post it on FB with all the crazy refugee stuff in the news and I've been taken back by the number of people that have responded to it.

    This last Sunday at church, I even had a gentleman stop me in the hall, thank me for the talk and introduce himself to me. Which was weird since we've been in the same ward for more than five years now and he acted like he'd never seen me before. I'm not exactly easy to miss.
    I am pretty sure that this bit from Elder Kearon was discomfiting to many LDS members:


    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  5. #65
    Senior Member Scorcho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    I am pretty sure that this bit from Elder Kearon was discomfiting to many LDS members:

    very inspiring

  6. #66

  7. #67
    I was teaching on Liberty Jail today and somehow someone managed to take a swipe at climate change during the lesson...that was a first.

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    “It only ends once. Anything that happens before that is just progress.”

    Well, because he thought it was good sport. Because some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned, or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.

  8. #68
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrumNFeather View Post
    I was teaching on Liberty Jail today and somehow someone managed to take a swipe at climate change during the lesson...that was a first.

    Sent from my LG-D800 using Tapatalk
    Our HPG lesson last Sunday (topic: "Home --The Basis of a Righteous Life") veered into a brief discussion of US immigration issues.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    Our HPG lesson last Sunday (topic: "Home --The Basis of a Righteous Life") veered into a brief discussion of US immigration issues.
    You can't hope to teach HPs anything, you can only hope to entertain them.


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  10. #70
    My lesson was about the Brother of Jared last week and before I knew it, we were talking about the new "titty pool" in town. Of course, my class if full of 5 year olds, one of which has trouble with his k's, so we're off topic more than we are on topic.

  11. #71
    Senior Member Scorcho's Avatar
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    I've gone rogue with the Come follow me, youth lessons. I've taught the same Sunday School class since the new program came about, and some of these lessons are simply too dry.

    Can we get some revelation from above that 13-14 year olds aren't all that interested in how they can become a better youth council member? Try filling 45 minutes of time in with that topic.

  12. #72
    Quote Originally Posted by Scorcho View Post
    I've gone rogue with the Come follow me, youth lessons. I've taught the same Sunday School class since the new program came about, and some of these lessons are simply too dry.

    Can we get some revelation from above that 13-14 year olds aren't all that interested in how they can become a better youth council member? Try filling 45 minutes of time in with that topic.
    Going rogue is what it's all about. Feel free to adjust to their needs.

  13. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by Scorcho View Post
    I've gone rogue with the Come follow me, youth lessons. I've taught the same Sunday School class since the new program came about, and some of these lessons are simply too dry.

    Can we get some revelation from above that 13-14 year olds aren't all that interested in how they can become a better youth council member? Try filling 45 minutes of time in with that topic.
    I teach the same age group also (some of the rebellious 15 - 18 years join us each week). I look over all of the lesson plans at once, which I quite like, and come up with a plan for the whole month—figuring out how to create one continuous message over four to five weeks with each week building on the next. This last month was pretty dry subject matter, so I tied in some current events happening in the Ward to hammer home the importance of making covenants. Spending an entire hour last week talking about the two YSA couples recently married in the temple, culminating this past week with the idea that ultimately, covenants are the means by which the Lord blesses us, and helps us find lasting happiness as opposed to temporary moments of happiness.

    I cited a Harvard study on the benefits of expressing gratitude. Another study on the benefits of strong relationships and then another study espousing the idea that a life a service leads to a fulfilling and mostly happy life. We talked about how the world is searching for the same things we are. Of course, we can be blessed to learn these truths without the benefit of such studies and simply by attending church, starting with primary where we learned about gratitude in the first place. I really like, as did my class, the following Chinese saying taken from Time magazine (don't know how legit it is):

    “If you want happiness for an hour, take a nap. If you want happiness for a day, go fishing. If you want happiness for a year, inherit a fortune. If you want happiness for a lifetime, help somebody.”
    Last edited by tooblue; 08-02-2017 at 04:29 PM.

  14. #74
    As fate would have it, I'm speaking in sacrament meeting on Sunday, something like 9-10 hours after the conclusion of the game. My ward has more BYU fans than Utah fans, although as is often the case many of them are very casual fans ("Is that guy with the weird name still the coach???") but there are some season ticket holders as well. The topic is "Enduring Well" so it's like a perfect storm for some hidden messages about the BYU fans have to endure some more Ute dominance....as long as we can win this thing.

    Anyway, post some good potshots for me to include in my talk. (Lest we tempt fate you may post some self-deprecating "I can't believe Utah lost" jokes as well).

  15. #75
    If we win, I'd take the high road and say/wear nothing.

    If we lose, I'd consider just not showing up.

  16. #76
    I'll share with you a story I shared once in a talk, including the impromptu joke I made...

    The topic was covenants and I was speaking about how the covenants we make with God are personal and we shouldn't judge others poorly because they haven't made the same covenants that we have. So I shared the true story of me walking into Smith's with my then 4yo daughter. There was a man who was standing outside smoking and she said loudly enough for him to hear, "Dad, that guy is really bad, he is smoking." Embarrassed I stooped down to talk to her and said (here was the impromptu joke), "Sweetie, he isn't bad because he is smoking... he is bad because he is wearing a BYU shirt." Equal parts groans and laughter. I hadn't planned to say that in my talk it just came out.

    What really happened was I did stop her and explain that him smoking wasn't bad because he hadn't made those promises to God like we had, and it didn't make him a bad person anyway even if it is bad for his health. I told her how my grandpa smoked and he was a very good man. And how covenants are gifts for us, not reasons to look down on others.


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  17. #77
    Quote Originally Posted by UBlender View Post
    As fate would have it, I'm speaking in sacrament meeting on Sunday, something like 9-10 hours after the conclusion of the game. My ward has more BYU fans than Utah fans, although as is often the case many of them are very casual fans ("Is that guy with the weird name still the coach???") but there are some season ticket holders as well. The topic is "Enduring Well" so it's like a perfect storm for some hidden messages about the BYU fans have to endure some more Ute dominance....as long as we can win this thing.

    Anyway, post some good potshots for me to include in my talk. (Lest we tempt fate you may post some self-deprecating "I can't believe Utah lost" jokes as well).
    I'm fine with a few general comments and jokes from the pulpit (for example, one time I was describing my brother-in-law, who was covered in tattoos, as having so many tattoos that even Rafael Araujo would have felt it was a little excessive), and I'm fine with them going both ways. However, I think if Utah manages to win then the loss will be just a little too fresh to even bring it up. If it were two weeks down the road I'd say fine, but I would probably leave it alone the following day.

  18. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by UBlender View Post
    As fate would have it, I'm speaking in sacrament meeting on Sunday, something like 9-10 hours after the conclusion of the game. My ward has more BYU fans than Utah fans, although as is often the case many of them are very casual fans ("Is that guy with the weird name still the coach???") but there are some season ticket holders as well. The topic is "Enduring Well" so it's like a perfect storm for some hidden messages about the BYU fans have to endure some more Ute dominance....as long as we can win this thing.

    Anyway, post some good potshots for me to include in my talk. (Lest we tempt fate you may post some self-deprecating "I can't believe Utah lost" jokes as well).
    nothing overt about the game; always a sore topic the day after.

    But you might base the talk around the 7 habits of highly effective people; or the 7 deadly sins; or the 7 wonders of the ancient world; etc.

  19. #79
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sancho View Post
    If we win, I'd take the high road and say/wear nothing.

    If we lose, I'd consider just not showing up.
    Be a gracious winner. We're better at that than they are.

    (In my ward when I was in the bishopric, during priesthood meeting opening announcements the day after a rivalry game, I always invited everyone to a "gloating session" out in the foyer after the block ended, regardless of who won. Everyone laughed about it and it was fun. No one really gloated. I stopped doing it when Utah kept winning game after game because it stopped being fun.)
    Last edited by LA Ute; 09-05-2017 at 02:35 PM.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  20. #80
    Senior Member Scorcho's Avatar
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    I don't gloat out of empathy. I grew up during the 70's and 80's. Being a Ute fan then was brutal and lonely. I feel bad for the young BYU kids today, some of them are too young to ever remember a BYU victory in football.
    Last edited by Scorcho; 09-05-2017 at 02:19 PM.

  21. #81
    Quote Originally Posted by Scorcho View Post
    I don't gloat out of empathy. I grew up during the 70's and 80's. Being a Ute fan then was brutal and lonely. I feel bad for the young BYU kids today, some of them are too young to ever remember a BYU victory in football.
    http://www.riseandshout.net/

  22. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by Applejack View Post
    nothing overt about the game; always a sore topic the day after.

    But you might base the talk around the 7 habits of highly effective people; or the 7 deadly sins; or the 7 wonders of the ancient world; etc.
    Yes, anything I say that references the game would be subtle, like only the people who are really listening (all four of them) would even notice and even then they'd have to be football fans to get the joke. It's not my style to bring up the rivalry with BYU fans at church very much. Having been on both sides of it I know how uncomfortable it can be so I usually keep it to myself at church.

  23. #83
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    I taught in Church today

    My beloved late FIL was a world-class organist. When he played in church the day after a Ute win (including in stake meetings) he would play "Utah Man" as the prelude music. He dressed the tune up in classical-sounding organ arrangements, but if you listened closely it was unmistakable and it was hilarious.
    Last edited by LA Ute; 09-05-2017 at 08:24 PM.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  24. #84
    Malleus Cougarorum Solon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    My beloved late FIL was a world-class organist. When he played in church the day after a Ute win (including in stake meetings) he would play "Utah Man" as the prelude music. He dressed the tune up in classical-sounding organ arrangements, but if you listened closely it was unmistakable and it was hilarious.
    This is starting to tempt the Football gods.
    Let's take UBlender's suggestion and put in some self-deprecating material so as not to appear over-confident.
    σοφῷ ἀνδρὶ Ἑλλὰς πάντα.
    -- Flavius Philostratus, Life of Apollonius 1.35.2.

  25. #85
    Quote Originally Posted by Solon View Post
    This is starting to tempt the Football gods.
    No kidding. We are going into our first real game of the season - on the road - with a green QB and offensive line. I think we can win, but this is not North Dakota.

  26. #86
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solon View Post
    This is starting to tempt the Football gods.
    Let's take UBlender's suggestion and put in some self-deprecating material so as not to appear over-confident.
    I plead innocent. I was just sharing a story about my father-in-law. I think the game is close to a tossup. Utah has the speed and athleticism advantage, but they have to execute. We had the same advantage last year, although to a lesser extent, and no one predicted we'd have six turnovers. I'm excited to see the game, and to see what happens.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  27. #87
    Malleus Cougarorum Solon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UBlender View Post
    As fate would have it, I'm speaking in sacrament meeting on Sunday, something like 9-10 hours after the conclusion of the game. My ward has more BYU fans than Utah fans, although as is often the case many of them are very casual fans ("Is that guy with the weird name still the coach???") but there are some season ticket holders as well. The topic is "Enduring Well" so it's like a perfect storm for some hidden messages about the BYU fans have to endure some more Ute dominance....as long as we can win this thing.

    Anyway, post some good potshots for me to include in my talk. (Lest we tempt fate you may post some self-deprecating "I can't believe Utah lost" jokes as well).
    Alright, I have been waiting all week. Seven is an easy lds and bible number to incorporate. Seven dispensations, seven seals in Revelation, seven minute abs.

    but I think you go with Jacob working for seven years to marry Rachel, and then coming up empty. Bitter disappointment for seven years. It must be hard going seven straight years with so much disappointment and heartache.
    He then had to endure seven more hard years before he got what he wanted.
    σοφῷ ἀνδρὶ Ἑλλὰς πάντα.
    -- Flavius Philostratus, Life of Apollonius 1.35.2.

  28. #88
    Tomorrow’s lesson is The Creation. Going to blow some 8 year old minds.


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  29. #89
    Sam the Sheepdog LA Ute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Schr-Ute View Post
    Tomorrow’s lesson is The Creation. Going to blow some 8 year old minds.


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    I hope you taught them that the T-Rex was created spiritually before it was naturally on the face of the earth.

    "It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
    --Antoine de Saint-Exupery

    "Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold."
    --Yeats

    “True, we [lawyers] build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures - unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men's burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.”

    --John W. Davis, founder of Davis Polk & Wardwell

  30. #90
    Quote Originally Posted by LA Ute View Post
    I hope you taught them that the T-Rex was created spiritually before it was naturally on the face of the earth.
    I did teach them that the fossil record shows that the T-Rex existed closer to the arrival of humans than it did to the stegosaurus. Does that count?


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